Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

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Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

Postby Athol Terence » Fri Nov 22, 2013 8:56 am

Incredible! Enjoy.

http://www.flyingmag.com/pilots-places/ ... OTY5NTk4S0

Regards,
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Re: Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

Postby Andrew Smit » Fri Nov 22, 2013 9:10 am

It's certainly not a difficult approach. Advanced maybe, but not difficult. RNP-AR approaches are all coded in the Nav Database and are flown using the Auto-Pilot and Flight Director. Far less stressful than flying an NDB or VOR.
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Re: Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

Postby Richard Smit » Fri Nov 22, 2013 10:00 am

Doesn't one usually capitalize headings? (Difficult Instrument Approach in New Zealand)
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Re: Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

Postby Athol Terence » Fri Nov 22, 2013 11:10 am

Dear Spoolup,

Yes if you are an American.

In British, South African, Australian and New Zealand English one uses 'sentence case'. Sadly our mother tongue is being badly affected by the use of US English. Examples are: programme - program, tyre - tire, colour - color, far too many Zs with countless other examples. Perhaps the worst example is the date: US English November 22, 2013 when the logical date should be 22 November 2013. [-X

I am rather particular about the use of slang and the use of American English, but I fear that most people in the modern world don't give a continental any longer. However, as an English speaking South African, I feel it is important to correctly maintain the 'mother tongue'. It also burns me when I see the Afrikaans language abused, where English words are mixed into the text because the person is too lazy to use the correct Afrikaans word. [-X

Regards,
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Re: Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

Postby Richard Smit » Fri Nov 22, 2013 11:28 am

There we go Athol... Now this is what you're an expert in.
Last edited by Richard Smit on Fri Nov 22, 2013 12:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

Postby CR Tech » Fri Nov 22, 2013 11:30 am

This was posted a few days ago in another tread. I think its spectacular and must take 110% commitment........... what a place
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Re: Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

Postby TWR FUNDI » Fri Nov 22, 2013 12:07 pm

divinehover wrote:It's certainly not a difficult approach. Advanced maybe, but not difficult. RNP-AR approaches are all coded in the Nav Database and are flown using the Auto-Pilot and Flight Director. Far less stressful than flying an NDB or VOR.


This is a 'hands off' approach. As long as the PF presses the right button!
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Re: Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

Postby Richard Smit » Fri Nov 22, 2013 12:11 pm

This is a 'hands off' approach. As long as the PF presses the right button!


Using his elbow, or toe!!

Seriously now...

SAA aircraft and pilots are approved and endorsed to fly RNP-AR approaches. Took a heap of effort by the likes of divinehover (here on Avcom), and the teams at ATNS/CAA, but it has been achieved.

This is superb use of technology!
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Re: Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

Postby TWR FUNDI » Fri Nov 22, 2013 12:17 pm

Spool Up - who inputs the nav for the AR?
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Re: Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

Postby Richard Smit » Fri Nov 22, 2013 12:32 pm

What do you mean TWR FUNDI?

The flying pilot programs the FMS, by selecting the required approach from those available in the database. Just like any other approach that we fly in a modern glass-cockpit airliner.

More technical questions should probably be directed toward our man called "divinehover", as he is the expert on this subject.
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Re: Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

Postby TWR FUNDI » Fri Nov 22, 2013 12:40 pm

Spool-Up wrote:What do you mean TWR FUNDI?

The flying pilot programs the FMS, by selecting the required approach from those available in the database. Just like any other approach that we fly in a modern glass-cockpit airliner.

More technical questions should probably be directed toward our man called "divinehover", as he is the expert on this subject.


Who programmes the data into the data base of the nav? The pilot selects the approach from a number of approaches already sitting in the database. What I'm trying to get at, should the 'person' adding the info to the database of the nav make an error, how would the pilot pick this error up?
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Re: Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

Postby Andrew Smit » Fri Nov 22, 2013 1:00 pm

[/quote]
Who programmes the data into the data base of the nav? The pilot selects the approach from a number of approaches already sitting in the database. What I'm trying to get at, should the 'person' adding the info to the database of the nav make an error, how would the pilot pick this error up?[/quote]

A data packer (Jepp) codes data from the AIP. The Nav Database vendor (Honeywell, Smiths etc) them code the data for the Operator. All of these organisations are approved in accordance with the relevant QA certification. Over and above this, An operator who conducts RNP-AR operations (SAA for example) also have an contract with a third party to check the RNP-Ao coding every Nav DB cycle. If after all of this there is still an error, it is up to the pilot to check the FMS coding to ensure it matches the approach chart.
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Re: Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

Postby Richard Smit » Fri Nov 22, 2013 1:03 pm

Last edited by Richard Smit on Fri Nov 22, 2013 1:24 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

Postby TWR FUNDI » Fri Nov 22, 2013 1:05 pm

divinehover wrote:

Who programmes the data into the data base of the nav? The pilot selects the approach from a number of approaches already sitting in the database. What I'm trying to get at, should the 'person' adding the info to the database of the nav make an error, how would the pilot pick this error up?[/quote]

A data packer (Jepp) codes data from the AIP. The Nav Database vendor (Honeywell, Smiths etc) them code the data for the Operator. All of these organisations are approved in accordance with the relevant QA certification. Over and above this, An operator who conducts RNP-AR operations (SAA for example) also have an contract with a third party to check the RNP-Ao coding every Nav DB cycle. If after all of this there is still an error, it is up to the pilot to check the FMS coding to ensure it matches the approach chart.[/quote]

Thank you!
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Re: Difficult instrument approach in New Zealand

Postby Calle_Hedberg » Fri Nov 22, 2013 3:05 pm

divinehover wrote:It's certainly not a difficult approach. Advanced maybe, but not difficult. RNP-AR approaches are all coded in the Nav Database and are flown using the Auto-Pilot and Flight Director. Far less stressful than flying an NDB or VOR.


Hi,

I agree with that - given the correct instrumentation, no RNAV approaches are "difficult" anymore. It's like flying on rails, with the machinery following the desired track to within a few feet.

What I find regrettable - at least in SA - is that the CAA is being so recalcitrant with regard to opening up RNAV/GNSS to general aviation pilots (at least those approaches that do not require special training/authorisation, which is most of them). I did the course last year and applied for aircraft approval in March 2013 - and I have not even had a response from the CAA yet (in writing - just some loose verbal promises of feedback "next week" some time in late March)

As divinehover correctly points out: flying an NDB or VOR is more stressful (and inherently more dangerous) than flying RNAV.

So Athol, a better title would have been "Beautiful instrument approach in New Zealand" - I watched the video twice too!

Regards from Dominica
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