Getting an EASA license in Ireland. Life after Brexit. (updated 19 March)

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Re: Getting an EASA license in Ireland. Life after Brexit.

Unread post by heinrich » Thu Mar 14, 2019 10:38 am

Just stumbled across this thread so a little late to the party.

Paul, if you are on a PPL, the process is not the same as for an ATPL as Cobus described above. In fact it's waaay simpler. I did my EASA conversion back in 2015/2016 when we came over. There's a couple of things you need to be aware of in terms of your SA license currency and total time requirements though, which was a showstopper for some people.

If you are interested I can post the details for PPL cenversion here?
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Re: Getting an EASA license in Ireland. Life after Brexit.

Unread post by cghellmann » Thu Mar 14, 2019 11:17 am

Hi Heinrich

I'm currently undergoing the process to get a Belgian EASA License [PPL].

I have only one question that nobody has been able to answer clearly - what do I need to do now in terms of logbooks?

Should I continue recording all of my entries in my South African logbook? (and keep it as a universal one)

Or do I need to buy a separate logbook for my EASA flights?

Thanks for the help

Chris
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Re: Getting an EASA license in Ireland. Life after Brexit.

Unread post by heinrich » Thu Mar 14, 2019 11:43 am

Hi Chris,

I don't know what the rules say to be honest, but I started with a new EASA logbook, and carried over my hours from my SA one.

Also, I seem to recall that in SA we don't log P1S (or some use PuT) time, we only do dual and solo. It might look a little odd if you switch to PIC or P1S in your SA logbook?

To be 100% sure maybe phone the Belgian CAA and get it from the horse's mouth. They may not like the idea of you keeping the SA one going.

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Re: Getting an EASA license in Ireland. Life after Brexit.

Unread post by cghellmann » Thu Mar 14, 2019 12:00 pm

heinrich wrote:
Thu Mar 14, 2019 11:43 am
Hi Chris,

I don't know what the rules say to be honest, but I started with a new EASA logbook, and carried over my hours from my SA one.

Also, I seem to recall that in SA we don't log P1S (or some use PuT) time, we only do dual and solo. It might look a little odd if you switch to PIC or P1S in your SA logbook?

To be 100% sure maybe phone the Belgian CAA and get it from the horse's mouth. They may not like the idea of you keeping the SA one going.

Baie sterkte!
Thanks, Heinrich!

Yes probably a good idea to call - was surprised not to be able to get an answer from the guys at the flying school though.

The issue is that I intend to continue flying in South Africa as well (I am between here and there) - so I can't really carry my hours across and then draw a line in the sand.

I will always have hours from SA and Belgium in any given year.
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Re: Getting an EASA license in Ireland. Life after Brexit.

Unread post by heinrich » Thu Mar 14, 2019 12:26 pm

Question is though, are you going to keep your SA license current? If not, then I'd say carry them over to your EASA license and log your SA time in there. Of course to do that you'll need to do the foreign license validation when in SA :roll: :roll: :D

Yeah don't trust what the flight school tells you. :D With respect to them of course, but they aren't all that abreast of foreign license requirements. Mine had it completely wrong the first time round where they thought a checkride and a simple form to the CAA would be sufficient for my conversion. Only when the CAA kicked it back to them, did they go through the trouble of checking exactly what the requirements are. Which paid off in the long run as they've had a few guys do it since then.

I am glad I did it to be honest, as I've mentioned here before, especially the practical RT exam. Keeping my SA license current would have been a waste as I've been here 4 years now, and not been back once. if you are going to go back and forth between SA and UK, then it may be worth keeping both.


@PaulW, you asked earlier about the SA accent in terms of language proficiency. It's actually not about which passport or citizenship you hold, it's about the issuing authority - i.e. the SA CAA. It's also not transferable from SA to another authority. To be honest mine was as simple as an instructor (can't be the one doing your flight test) signing the paperwork to say you are proficient. At that stage they've been dealing with me for a few weeks already so it was a very informal thing to just add one more piece of paper to my application. So no matter what level you had on your SA license, (I had 6 which is max IIRC?) it counts for nothing when you convert. Not a big deal anyway.
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Re: Getting an EASA license in Ireland. Life after Brexit.

Unread post by paulw » Sun Mar 17, 2019 5:22 am

@Heinrich, yes it you can add the requirements as you experienced, it will be great as the requirements should be the same regardless of which country I would think.

From what I could find out:
1. Do medical again even though passed it in SA in January.
2. Do Language proficiency although I have a 6/6 in SA
3. Write 2 x subjects. I think it was airlaw and Human Performances but not sure now, will have to check.
4. Do a practical flight test
5. Get letter from SA CAA to confirm my License

Thats what I could find out. I emailed the Irich "CAA" (I think IAA) but did not receive a reply yet so will phone them and check and Cobus also gave me a contact (Instructor in Cork) who will know the ins and outs. STill have to contact him too.

Been too busy doing the move and settle in an winding down SA side to spend too much time on this.
Also already found a Flight Medical doctor in Galway where I live so must make an appointment still.
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Re: Getting an EASA license in Ireland. Life after Brexit.

Unread post by heinrich » Mon Mar 18, 2019 10:57 am

1. Do medical again even though passed it in SA in January.
2. Do Language proficiency although I have a 6/6 in SA
3. Write 2 x subjects. I think it was airlaw and Human Performances but not sure now, will have to check.
4. Do a practical flight test
5. Get letter from SA CAA to confirm my License
Paul, I have it slightly different on some.

1. Yes. EASA class 2 medical is required, if you are planning on converting to EASA PPL. The catch is you have to have a valid SACAA class 2 medical before you convert. So it seems you are good on that front if recently renewed. The EASA class 2 is much simpler than SA's one, so you'll be fine if you passed the SA one.
2. Correct. I spoke to someone at the UK CAA about this as I also had a 6, they said it doesn't matter what's in your (ICAO) license. Due to the differences in accents from various countries, amongst other things, this is required. Like I said, this is really just a form they conplete, not really a "test".
3. Correct - Airlaw and Human Performances. If you haven't bought the books yet, PM me your address and I'll post you mine, I have no need for it anymore. Just need to check if they are still current.
4. Correct. This is the same as a PPL flight test. i.e. cross country nav etc. 8-[
5. This is not required. I never had to deal with our CAA to confirm anything (thank goodness). The only "gotcha" was that your license has to be valid and you have to have a min. of 100 hours TT. Maybe the UK CAA got in touch with the SA CAA to verify my license? I highly doubt it as their turnaround to process my license was a few days. Maybe the Irish require this validation, but being EASA the rules should be much more consistent with the other countries, so I doubt it.
6. You will also need to do your RT practical test. Our club/school didn't have the equipment or an examiner so had to go do this at Andrewsfield on the other side of Stansted.

I think I only started about 6-7 months after we got here. There were other higher priority things to take care of first.

Speak to the guy in Cork as well though, to check it's all still valid.

Hope this helps.
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Re: Getting an EASA license in Ireland. Life after Brexit.

Unread post by paulw » Mon Mar 18, 2019 1:51 pm

Thanks Heinrich, yes def a help. I will also check on the CAA confirmation. Maybe it is just something I had in my mind as a requirement (assumption) as it seems that a lot of countries require that. i.e. Australia etc
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Re: Getting an EASA license in Ireland. Life after Brexit.

Unread post by ANDY » Tue Mar 19, 2019 11:30 am

For those of you not planning to live and work in the EU, I would suggest you save your money and time and do a FAA ATP. At our Hong Kong based company we are reluctant to hire anybody without a FAA certificate as its too difficult and restrictive to get initial or recurrent training done on EASA or GBCAA licenses.
All training facilities in the corporate world have FAA examiners on staff.
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Re: Getting an EASA license in Ireland. Life after Brexit.

Unread post by -CoBuS- » Tue Mar 19, 2019 6:50 pm

I UPDATED THE MAIN POST WITH MORE INFORMATION AND TIPS AND TRICKS.
ANDY wrote:
Tue Mar 19, 2019 11:30 am
For those of you not planning to live and work in the EU, I would suggest you save your money and time and do a FAA ATP.
Andy, I agree to an extent.

There is no reason to do an EASA license if you do not plan to fly a European registered aircraft, but you can use it fly 'contract' on validations i.e. Isle of Man, Cayman or Bermuda registered aircraft for operators world wide (how long will the world accept the South African license is also another question to ask?).

I do fully agree though - the FAA license is the best license world wide in my opinion as it is easy to convert, verify, add types etc and I am very thankful I have it, but, I found that my FAA ATP is not a license I could use to settle down with my family as I see it as a 'contract pilot license', as we cannot fly in the US at all and I had to convert.

I know at least 10 people that are busy with their EASA licenses and I know there are many more that want to know, hence me sharing my experience of this process.

I think the main point that both you and I want to make is that it is very important to get another license aside from our green book full of photocopies.

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