Photographic Tips / Workshop

Photography with reference to Aviation

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Re: Photographic Tips / Workshop

Unread post by Midnight-mann » Fri Jan 09, 2009 11:39 pm

hello guys,

so where are the tips.lol. this is a subject we need more info on. maybe we can revive it.
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Re: Photographic Tips / Workshop

Unread post by Deanw » Mon Jan 12, 2009 10:00 am

Vertical_Reference wrote:Does anyone know of any aviation photography workshops or courses running?
A photography course is presently under development by one of the best aviation photographers in SA. It will be finalised in the next few days and will be widely publicised as courses will be run in all major centres. :D
How come every time my ship comes in I'm at the airport?

http://www.SAairforce.co.za
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Re: Photographic Tips / Workshop

Unread post by Sideslip » Mon Jan 19, 2009 6:04 pm

Vertical_Reference wrote:Does anyone know of any aviation photography workshops or courses running?

http://www.avpix.co.za/AVPIXschool/Home.html#
Mike Gill
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Stephan Rossouw
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Re: Photographic Tips / Workshop

Unread post by Stephan Rossouw » Fri Feb 13, 2009 6:17 pm

Interactive website called: Photoshop for Photographers.. Lots of usefull info.. 8)

http://epaperpress.com/psphoto/index.html
All photos Copyright Stephan Rossouw Photography 2017

Home Page:
Stephan Rossouw Photography
http://www.stephanrossouw.co.za
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Re: Photographic Tips / Workshop

Unread post by Stephan Rossouw » Fri Feb 13, 2009 6:19 pm

All photos Copyright Stephan Rossouw Photography 2017

Home Page:
Stephan Rossouw Photography
http://www.stephanrossouw.co.za
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kb
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Re: Photographic Tips / Workshop

Unread post by kb » Sat Feb 21, 2009 10:10 pm

OK, so I got a 350D, nothing fancy, but more than adequate. I also spoilt myself on a Canon, 75 - 300 USM (what ever that means, sounds cool).

I ALWAYS shoot on L mode. Never used RAW, and for one simple reason.

By the time I get home, and download the pics from the family braai, and delete the kak shots, and doubles, (cause some people don't know that you must let go the shutter button!!!!), and decide which pics I want to keep, it's almost midnight. Now, people say I must edit, and sharpen, and change color etc etc of the pics. Goodness, don't you sleep? how long does this take you? I mean, for myself, just managing to get a decent shot is a blessing, let alone having to edit it.

Secondly, on L, the average size of pics, is 2 - 3 MB. I only have a 80 GIG hard drive, and am constantly finding that the pics are eating up my storage space. Is there a way of saving them, in "High res", but using less space, or must I go and buy a 50 million terrabyte external harddrive, with it's own built in generator??

Lastly, I understand ISO, shutter speed, F-stop to a degree that I can use the camera, and change the basic funtions. BUT, it is so few and far between, that I really get a "good" shot. I find that most of the time, I just click, without thinking about what settings to change. Is it just practise, and experimenting, or are there some rules that you use. I mean, when you shooting aircraft, do you always set XYZ accordingly, and then have different rules for when shooting pics of the family at a braai???


COmments on the above??

kb.
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Re: Photographic Tips / Workshop

Unread post by Thndr_strck » Sat Feb 21, 2009 10:54 pm

I read a pretty interesting article on Aperture priority setting, I'll see if I can dig it up for you. I use and external hard-drive to store the pic's i wanna keep, and always shoot on highest res, and very seldom on RAW, unless it's a wedding or special occasion. I have a 2gb CF card and a 2gb Xd card in my camera, and don't fill them up very often.
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Re: Photographic Tips / Workshop

Unread post by echodelta » Mon Feb 23, 2009 8:01 am

kb wrote:Lastly, I understand ISO, shutter speed, F-stop to a degree that I can use the camera, and change the basic funtions. BUT, it is so few and far between, that I really get a "good" shot. I find that most of the time, I just click, without thinking about what settings to change. Is it just practise, and experimenting, or are there some rules that you use. I mean, when you shooting aircraft, do you always set XYZ accordingly, and then have different rules for when shooting pics of the family at a braai???
I'm no photo expert, but here is how I setup my shots and it seems to work well for me.

Firstly you probbaly know that :
1. ISO is the sensitivity of your "film". Higher ISO = More exposure.
2. Shutter speed is the length of time that the shutter stays open. Lower shutter speed (higher number) = More exposure.
3. F-stop (aperture size) is the size the aperture opens up to when a photo is taken. Larger aperture = More exposure.

If I am taking a photo of something that is moving and I don't want it to blur then I will set my shutter speed faster (lower number). How fast depends on how much blur you are willing to acomodate. Keep in mind that (given a certain ISO setting) if you speed up the shutter, you will have to increase the aperture size to get the same exposure (to expose the sensor to the same amount of light). If you use shutter priority mode (Tv) then the camera automagically adjusts the f-stop (aperture) to maintain exposure.

If I would like to take a shot where I want to control if the background and foreground is in focus or out of focus (I think its called depth of field) then I change the aperture size (f-stop). The same applies here. If you adjust the aperture size you will have to adjust the shutter speed as well to maintain exposure (for a given ISO). The camera can also do this for you automagically by using the aperture priority (Av) setting.

The only time I fiddle with the ISO setting is when I am dead-set on using a certain shutter speed together with a certain aperture setting, but my exposure is not right. I then adjust the ISO to get the right exposure. With my camera I can set the ISO to Auto and the camera does this for me, but sometimes it is necessary to force it into a setting to get the right picture. I know if you get technical about it then certain ISO settings are recommended for certain times of the day, but I haven't quite memorized that part yet. I find I can get the pictures I want without fiddling too much with ISO.

I hope this sheds some light on your problem, kb...
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Re: Photographic Tips / Workshop

Unread post by Thndr_strck » Mon Feb 23, 2009 11:55 am

Try get hold of the January edition of Digital SLR Photography, or any photo mag, they will have lots of info and ideas.
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Re: Photographic Tips / Workshop

Unread post by AIRBATIC » Tue May 12, 2009 2:21 am

Im looking into getting myself a Canon EOS 1000D with an 18 - 55mm lens, any suggestions on my choice?
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Re: Photographic Tips / Workshop

Unread post by macarbiter » Tue May 12, 2009 9:52 am

AIRBATIC wrote:Im looking into getting myself a Canon EOS 1000D with an 18 - 55mm lens, any suggestions on my choice?
The 1000D isn't a bad piece of equipment and is used by some here on avcom. It is basically a stripped down 450D with a 10MP sensor, slightly smaller LCD and 7-point AF.

The only thing that I don't like about the 1000D is that it doesn't come with a proximity sensor above the LCD screen. This means that if the screen is on and you put your face up to the view finder, it doesn't switch off automatically like the 450D (and probably the 500D too).

But, you can't beat the price of the 1000D.

The only other thing, is that the 18-55mm lens is great for general use, but because it has no telephoto capability to speak of, it definitely suffice for aviation photography, unless you only take photos of planes from a few metres away. But this is an issue with the 1000D, 450D and 500D.

In terms of additional lenses, there is the Canon 55-250mm IS lens, the Canon 75-300mm non-IS lens (the IS version costs same as the 1000D), the Sigma 70-300mm non-IS lens. These range in cost from about R3000-R3500. There is another useful lens, the Canon 18-200mm IS lens, which is a great all-purpose lens, but costs R8000. Sigma answered this by also creating a 18-200mm OS (same as Canon IS) lens for R5000.
Malcolm

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Re: Photographic Tips / Workshop

Unread post by AIRBATIC » Wed May 13, 2009 3:21 am

macarbiter wrote:
AIRBATIC wrote:Im looking into getting myself a Canon EOS 1000D with an 18 - 55mm lens, any suggestions on my choice?
The 1000D isn't a bad piece of equipment and is used by some here on avcom. It is basically a stripped down 450D with a 10MP sensor, slightly smaller LCD and 7-point AF.

The only thing that I don't like about the 1000D is that it doesn't come with a proximity sensor above the LCD screen. This means that if the screen is on and you put your face up to the view finder, it doesn't switch off automatically like the 450D (and probably the 500D too).

But, you can't beat the price of the 1000D.

The only other thing, is that the 18-55mm lens is great for general use, but because it has no telephoto capability to speak of, it definitely suffice for aviation photography, unless you only take photos of planes from a few metres away. But this is an issue with the 1000D, 450D and 500D.

In terms of additional lenses, there is the Canon 55-250mm IS lens, the Canon 75-300mm non-IS lens (the IS version costs same as the 1000D), the Sigma 70-300mm non-IS lens. These range in cost from about R3000-R3500. There is another useful lens, the Canon 18-200mm IS lens, which is a great all-purpose lens, but costs R8000. Sigma answered this by also creating a 18-200mm OS (same as Canon IS) lens for R5000.
Thanks
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Re: Photographic Tips / Workshop

Unread post by echodelta » Wed May 13, 2009 8:22 am

I recently bought the Canon 70-300 IS lens for my Canon 450D. It seems to be a very good lens optically and I can tell you that I am glad I didn't go for the non-IS lens. You can easily shoot from the hand at 300mm in most conditions. This depends on how you will be using it though. I use mine for wildlife photography where you mostly don't have time to setup a tripod (or monopod or beanbag). If you will have more time to setup then by all means go for the non-IS lens. You will save a lot of cash.

I would have loved to go to 500mm, but I opted for an hour in an R22 instead :lol: :lol:
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Re: Photographic Tips / Workshop

Unread post by Danger Dave » Mon Aug 10, 2009 8:07 pm

macarbiter wrote:
AIRBATIC wrote:Im looking into getting myself a Canon EOS 1000D with an 18 - 55mm lens, any suggestions on my choice?
The 1000D isn't a bad piece of equipment and is used by some here on avcom. It is basically a stripped down 450D with a 10MP sensor, slightly smaller LCD and 7-point AF.

The only thing that I don't like about the 1000D is that it doesn't come with a proximity sensor above the LCD screen. This means that if the screen is on and you put your face up to the view finder, it doesn't switch off automatically like the 450D (and probably the 500D too).

But, you can't beat the price of the 1000D.

The only other thing, is that the 18-55mm lens is great for general use, but because it has no telephoto capability to speak of, it definitely suffice for aviation photography, unless you only take photos of planes from a few metres away. But this is an issue with the 1000D, 450D and 500D.

In terms of additional lenses, there is the Canon 55-250mm IS lens, the Canon 75-300mm non-IS lens (the IS version costs same as the 1000D), the Sigma 70-300mm non-IS lens. These range in cost from about R3000-R3500. There is another useful lens, the Canon 18-200mm IS lens, which is a great all-purpose lens, but costs R8000. Sigma answered this by also creating a 18-200mm OS (same as Canon IS) lens for R5000.
Would the Sigma 70-300mm non IS lens be suffice for taking aviation photography?
As i bought recently a 450 D with a 18-55mm lens

DD
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Re: Photographic Tips / Workshop

Unread post by Sideslip » Thu Aug 13, 2009 12:33 pm

Hi Dave.

In theory, the Sigma 70-300 lens should work just fine on a 450D but for some reason I had a few issues with this combo.

My first DSLR camera was a 350D and the lens worked just fine on this body.

A little over a year ago I upgraded to a 450D and I was a little disappointed in the pics I was getting when using the “long” lens. It seems as though the auto focus is not 100% compatible between camera and lens so I would consult a reputable and knowledgeable camera dealer on this.

In all fairness, when I was having problems, the camera was very new to me and this could have part of the problem but I am sure to this day that there is a small compatibility issue.

I now leave the Sigma on the 350D and do all my aviation photography with this camera and lens. I don’t bother swapping to the 450D for this kind of photography, in fact, I have not used the Sigma lens on the 450 in about 10 months or so.

All round I quite like my 450D. I am now using it for wedding photography with a 17-85mm IS USM lens. However my trusty 350D is never far out of reach.

Just a thought.
Mike Gill

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