Windsock Photos

Photography with reference to Aviation

Moderator: Moderators

North Sea
Take off Clearance
Posts: 136
Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2006 1:03 pm
Has liked: 0
Been liked: 0

Re: Windsock Photos

Unread post by North Sea » Sun Aug 21, 2011 8:10 pm

Image

RAF Waddington 2011
User avatar
goga
Too Tousand
Too Tousand
Posts: 2462
Joined: Fri Oct 29, 2004 6:07 pm
Location: pta
Has liked: 0
Been liked: 6 times

Re: Windsock Photos

Unread post by goga » Sun Aug 21, 2011 9:32 pm

virginia 20111.JPG
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Proper-previous- planning-prevents-piss-poor-performance
Derek Hopkins
User avatar
Chopper1
Rolling
Posts: 158
Joined: Sat Oct 25, 2008 9:37 pm
Location: Hovering @ FAGM
Has liked: 0
Been liked: 0

Re: Windsock Photos

Unread post by Chopper1 » Fri Aug 26, 2011 10:45 am

Windsock at Zongoene Lodge, Mozambique - Aug 2011.
Mozambique - Windsock @ Zongoene Lodge - Aug 2011.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Tinus Bosch

"Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you to recognize a mistake when you make it again" - Franklin P. Jones
User avatar
Terri
Tripped over wheel chock
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2008 7:16 pm
Location: Lanseria
Has liked: 0
Been liked: 0

Re: Windsock Photos

Unread post by Terri » Fri Aug 26, 2011 5:50 pm

Doko DRC
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
User avatar
scanavphoto
Frequent AvComer
Posts: 818
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2008 11:18 pm
Closest Airfield: ENGM
Location: Oslo
Has liked: 1 time
Been liked: 0

Re: Windsock Photos

Unread post by scanavphoto » Mon Aug 29, 2011 1:35 pm

Not the sharpest of pictures (shot from a moving car) at North Weald

Image
svenolivier
Lining Up
Posts: 111
Joined: Thu Dec 10, 2009 2:53 pm
Has liked: 0
Been liked: 2 times

Re: Windsock Photos

Unread post by svenolivier » Sun Sep 11, 2011 3:42 pm

fawc
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
User avatar
Ray W
10000 and still climbing
10000 and still climbing
Posts: 16294
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2006 4:17 pm
Closest Airfield: OR Tambo
Location: Atlasville.
Has liked: 160 times
Been liked: 78 times

Re: Windsock Photos

Unread post by Ray W » Wed Sep 21, 2011 9:44 pm

Swartkop a couple of months ago
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Old age & treachery will triumph over youth & skill
User avatar
Velocity
1k poster
1k poster
Posts: 1609
Joined: Fri Jan 21, 2005 9:49 am
Location: Coca Cola Dome - Jhb
Has liked: 0
Been liked: 0

Re: Windsock Photos

Unread post by Velocity » Thu Sep 22, 2011 8:28 pm

SAAF Museum Swartkops AFB

Image
User avatar
Bob Corbett
Frequent AvComer
Posts: 641
Joined: Thu Jul 14, 2005 7:58 pm
Location: Cape Town
Has liked: 0
Been liked: 0

Re: Windsock Photos

Unread post by Bob Corbett » Sat Sep 24, 2011 11:00 am

Sling 4 landing at FASH 23/09/2011
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Best wishes,
Bob
User avatar
Vaughan
1k poster
1k poster
Posts: 1052
Joined: Tue Dec 19, 2006 1:44 pm
Closest Airfield: Peterborough Airport EGSF
Location: Yaxley
Has liked: 3 times
Been liked: 2 times

Re: Windsock Photos

Unread post by Vaughan » Sat Sep 24, 2011 10:21 pm

Windsock at sunset - Tedderfield
Sunset Windsock Tedderfield.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Vaughan Russel-Smith
User avatar
E.S.
Steep Turn Right
Posts: 290
Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2006 9:39 pm
Closest Airfield: FIMP
Location: MRU
Has liked: 0
Been liked: 0

Re: Windsock Photos

Unread post by E.S. » Sun Oct 02, 2011 1:31 pm

Nzerekore Airstrip Windsock in Guinea.
GUNZ - Nzerekore.jpg
Aviate, Navigate, Communicate !!!
User avatar
Velocity
1k poster
1k poster
Posts: 1609
Joined: Fri Jan 21, 2005 9:49 am
Location: Coca Cola Dome - Jhb
Has liked: 0
Been liked: 0

Re: Windsock Photos

Unread post by Velocity » Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:19 pm

Around Gauteng

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

V
User avatar
Vaughan
1k poster
1k poster
Posts: 1052
Joined: Tue Dec 19, 2006 1:44 pm
Closest Airfield: Peterborough Airport EGSF
Location: Yaxley
Has liked: 3 times
Been liked: 2 times

Re: Windsock Photos

Unread post by Vaughan » Tue Oct 18, 2011 9:44 am

Rand on Sunday evening, Silver ball and an in-bound Bonanza in the background
Sun.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Vaughan Russel-Smith
User avatar
Jolly Jim
Take off Clearance
Posts: 130
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 4:00 pm
Location: Centurion
Has liked: 3 times
Been liked: 0

Re: Windsock Photos

Unread post by Jolly Jim » Sat Feb 04, 2012 4:13 pm

AFB Swartkops
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Jolly Jim

The difference between impossible and possible is merely the measure of man's determination - James Thain
User avatar
scanavphoto
Frequent AvComer
Posts: 818
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2008 11:18 pm
Closest Airfield: ENGM
Location: Oslo
Has liked: 1 time
Been liked: 0

Re: Windsock Photos

Unread post by scanavphoto » Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:13 am

I have been searching for this photo. It was taken in 1974 in the Advent Valley on Spitsbergen roughly 78 degrees 10 minutes North (give or take a few seconds), 16 deg 18 min E roughly. The airstrip was actually "built" on the tundra. Excerpt from an article printed in Airways in the mid 1990s
In February of 1958, however, Store Norske Spitsbergen Kulkompani needed to fly a seriously injured man to the mainland for proper medical care. The RNoAF accepted the task. The challenge lay in finding suitable landing ground for the Catalina. During WW2, the German Luftwaffe maintained meteorological stations on the islands, and had built a rudimentary air strip in the Advent Valley close to Longyearbyen. The strip was cleared for snow by Store Norske. The Catalina landed safely after a 7 hour flight and returned safely to the mainland. This opened new perspectives for opening a new «life line» to the mainland.

On the mainland, Braathens South American and Far Eastern Airtransport was suffering from the Norwegian, and indeed Scandinavian, aviation policy of the day. Braathens SAFE had originally been started as an extension of Ludvig G. Braathen’s shipping company. Having seen the increasing cost and inconvenience in shipping spares and replacements crews world wide, Ludvig G. Braathen set up his own charter airline to fill the needs of the Norwegian merchant fleet using surplus USAAF C-54s. This was in 1946. He also ventured into scheduled services and in 1949 pioneered services to the Far East with the longest over land service originating in Western Europe, linking Oslo with Hong Kong. The service also had a connection to New York via Iceland in co-operation with Loftleidir. In 1951, however, the Scandinavian governments decided to award all international routes to SAS, the Scandinavian chosen instrument. A Norwegian shipowner has weathered more than one storm and during the 1950’s Braathens started to develop domestic services as well as international charters using DC-3s, DC-4s, DC-6s, and DeHavilland Herons.

It was this company that Store Norske approached after the successful Catalina landing in 1958. The main concern was whether it at all would be possible to operate a charter service from Northern Norway to Spitzbergen. Braathens SAFE gave chief pilot Carl L. Larsen the task of considering the aspects of operating one of the company’s DC-4s on almost 600 nm sector over the Arctic Sea, flying into a snow strip on the frozen tundra.

Flying there is one thing. Finding the tiny strip in the Arctic wilderness is a whole other ball park. This task was put in the hands of Chief Navigator Bjørn Western who was no stranger to the Arctic. He was among other things responsible for rebuilding the radio station at Bear Island after WW2. He knew most of the stations and radio operators personally. This laid a solid foundation for a good working relationship. There were radio stations at Bear Island, Hopen Island, and Isfjord on Spitzbergen. The natural route to fly was from Bardufoss airport (BDU) on the mainland via Bear Island, on to Isfjord Radio and in to the Advent Fjord and up the Advent Valley.

Store Norske was tasked with building the «runway». An 1,800 m long and 40 m wide landing strip was prepared in the Advent Valley, just outside Longyearbyen. The strip was thoroughly prepared to accommodate the Skymaster. All unevenness in the frozen surface was levelled out. The snowy surface was packed hard so the aircraft wouldn’t sink into the snow and get stuck.

Range posed no problem. A way of navigating had been found. A landing strip was built. Longyearbyen lies at 7814' North. The sun goes under the horizon on 26 October, but leaves a trail of light until the Polar Night settles 14 November. From then, it is pitch dark until 1 February when the light gradually returns. On 20 March the sun again rises above the horizon. This aspect in combination with acceptable weather conditions, posed the greatest problem. Flights could only be operated when the ground was frozen enough to carry the weight of the DC-4. When the temperature in the permafrost rises above -5 C, a fully loaded DC-4 can sink through the soft top layer and get stuck. There were absolutely no landing aids whatsoever available. Landing could only be done under strict VFR-conditions. This meant that there had to be a full moon to provide enough light.

On 2 April 1959 Douglas DC-4 Skymaster LN-SUP Norse Commander left Bardufoss airport in Northern Norway at 0908 heading north to Bear Island and Spitzbergen with a crew of 6 and 54 passengers. The crew on this first flight was Captain Halvdan Furøy, First Officer Jan Henriksen, Navigator Karl Henrik Lefdal, Flight Engineers Kristian Lilledal and Nils Hallanger, with Purser Rolf Prytz seeing to the passengers. Norse Commander carried some unusual extra equipment: a rifle in case of an emergency landing on land where there are quite a number of polar bears, rubber dinghies, and special survival suits made of aluminium to improve the chances of surviving an emergency landing on land or water. The plane carried 65 of these survival suits. The emergency locator transmitter and portable radio equipment was stored to the rear of the plane to protect them from impact. The flight itself was uneventful and after some 4 hours, it flew up the Advent Valley and landed to much furore at Longyearbyen’s tundra strip. This opened Spitzbergen to commercial flying.

The early Spring operations continued into the early 60’s. The first attempt on «night operations» was made in 1965. At 1500 hrs on 8 December LN-SUP commanded by captain Rolf W. Johannessen (later chief pilot) left Tromsø for Longyearbyen in the dark of the Arctic night. «We flew out on a compass heading towards Bear Island. As we approached the island our R/T called up the radio station at Bear Island on the Morse set. We had an unofficial code. They would keep their Morse key pressed down for a full minute so that we could direct our radio compass to the signal and get a fix of our position. We flew over the island and dropped the Christmas mail and a little something from Braathens - a crate of fruit and a copy of Playboy magazine.

From Bear Island we headed up the western side of Spitzbergen and repeated the procedure at Isfjord Radio. Flying in the Isfjord was easy, but dark. The Arctic night can be very dark indeed. We were fortunate in that the weather was good and we had a moon. Flying up the Advent Valley past Longyearbyen, we could make out the strip. The mining company had put a truck at the end of the runway to mark it and using goose necks as runway lights. I know it sounds hairy by today’s standards, but it was the best of what was available to us at the time. This was a trial run.»

This along with a second flight on 28 December, proved the feasibility of winter operations. In order to meet operational demands, landing aids were acquired with landing lights and VASI (Vertical Approach Slope Indicator) being installed first. Later electrical runway lights were installed - fully equipped with emergency power. The runway was also outlined with black barrels to provide contrast against the snow. Braathens set up a fuel and spares depot and had necessary ground equipment, such as fuel bowser, 4 engine heaters, and external power supply, on the tundra.

Former chief pilot Carl Ludvig Larsen was responsible for the operational aspects of the Spitzbergen flights: «The let down procedure was different from today’s», recounts captain Larsen. «We would fly up the western coast of Spitzbergen up to the mouth of the Isfjord. In good VMC (Visual Meteorological Conditions) we would fly in the Isfjord to Hotellneset and turn sharply following the Advent Fjord up the Advent Valley to the strip which lay in the extension of the fjord.

In cloudy weather, we would turn and do a 360 circle over sea to the west of the islands before flying straight in the Isfjord towards the NDB Braathens had installed at Hotellneset. The procedure called for us to be pass the NDB at 5,000 feet. Here we would turn towards the strip where Braathens had installed a crossbar 400 m from the threshold to get a visual fix. The crossbar lights had to be visible at 1,500 feet otherwise you couldn’t land.»

The DC-6B was introduced to the Spitzbergen route on 18 April 1966. The type made a total of 121 flights up to 1973. Braathens had its first Boeing 737-205s and Fokker F28s delivered in 1969. The first jet service to Spitzbergen and tundra strip was with a Fokker F28 Fellowship LN-SUC Olav Kyrre on 29 April 1972. Travel time was dramatically cut with the introduction of the Fellowship, but the Dutch jetliner did not have the necessary cargo capacity to meet Store Norske’s requirements. The 737 was more suitable. The question was: Could it operate to the tundra strip?

In cooperation with Boeing, Captain Larsen surveyed the tundra strip. Every 30 m an iron rod was driven into the surface and using reflecting wire, the surface was checked for undulations. The frozen surface was measured to find how much weight it could carry. Braathens had installed equipment to monitor the temperature in the surface. If it rose to above -5 C, the ice surface changed colour and there would be problems operating heavy aircraft. The runway was lengthened to 2,100 m with a 300 m overrun area to accommodate landings with a tail wind of up to 15 kt. An NDB was erected at Hotellneset at the mouth of the Advent Fjord. Boeing was satisfied with the work laid down by Braathens SAFE and Store Norske and gave their go ahead. The first Boeing 737 from TOS to the Advent Valley flight was made by -205C LN-SUA Halvdan Svarte on 17 January 1974. Braathens’ two most senior pilots, chief pilot Carl L. Larsen and captain Rolf W. Johannessen, who later succeeded captain Larsen as chief pilot, carried out the first 737 flight. Later the same day another crew, captains Ole B. Haugnæss and Gunnar Tajet, flew TOS-Advent Valley-FBU.

Braathens’ 100th flight to the tundra strip was on 5 January 1972. It took 13 years to pass the first centennial. Flight number 200 was carried out a mere two years later with 737 LN-SUA on 17 April 1974. The last and 204th flight to the tundra strip was made 8 days later. All operations to the tundra ceased on 25 April 1974.
When I researched this story, the people in the Braathens SAFE archives claimed the windsock was frozen in position. Somehow, I doubt it even though it is a great story :D

Image

Return to “Aviation Photography”