Deaf Pilots?

Medicine and other human performance related issues.

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Chalkie
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Re: Deaf Pilots?

Unread post by Chalkie » Tue Sep 04, 2018 1:13 pm

Flymed wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 8:18 am
CAA does not require testing at 5000Hz, but only for 500, 1000, 2000 and 3000Hz.
Sorry, my mistake :oops: It is 3000Hz.

What I do not understand is I pass the whisper test with my DAME and CAA are going the whole hog after me. Comair B738 simulator hire for one hour, plus I have to pay for simulator instructor, plus CAA Senior AME, plus CAA approve DAME, plus CAA approved ENT Professor etc All this for a retired ex ATPL, now CPL and soon to be PPL. :shock:

All this and all it should take is an interview in the doctor's office where they can talk, give ATC instructions etc and see if I can hear, understand and respond.

To me they are hunting rabbits with a 12inch cannon. Collateral damage for me to pay for... [-(
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Re: Deaf Pilots?

Unread post by Flymed » Tue Sep 04, 2018 7:13 pm

The cut off value is more than 50dB at 3000Hz. If you are at 50 dB at 3000dB and no more, it is time that your doctor writes a stern letter to SACAA; and if he/she is the reason for such a decision, then it is time for a new doctor. That is if your hearing threshold is at 50 or less, and the lower frequencies at 35 or less.
Hope this helps.
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Re: Deaf Pilots?

Unread post by Rotor kop » Wed Sep 12, 2018 9:48 am

Chalkie i also have titinus in both ears (one is worse than other) from shooting (and plenty slaps from Mom) big caliber rifles without earmuffs as youngster. I somehow pass my hearing test every year even though my ears ring badly.
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Re: Deaf Pilots?

Unread post by cage » Wed Sep 12, 2018 10:06 am

Rotor kop wrote:
Wed Sep 12, 2018 9:48 am
Chalkie i also have titinus in both ears (one is worse than other) from shooting (and plenty slaps from Mom) big caliber rifles without earmuffs as youngster. I somehow pass my hearing test every year even though my ears ring badly.
Is your doc using the new test equipment for older pilots?
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Re: Deaf Pilots?

Unread post by Skymaster » Wed Sep 12, 2018 12:51 pm

Most people thing that being deaf means that you can't hear.
This is not true.
Most "deaf" people can hear, with their hearing attenuated at certain frequencies.
Modern hearing aids can be adjusted to amplify these frequencies so that full spectrum hearing can be attained.
This is done by an audiologist who determines your attenuated frequencies and adjusts the hearing aids via a computer and wi-fi.
I have a hearing problem and purchased a pair of the latest devices.
They are remarkable.
They have a wi fi faclity that connects them to your cell phone - so simple pressing a button on the near invisible device behind your ear, connects to the phone and Voila, your call comes though on your hearing devices!!
You can talk back hands free as the mike in the hearing devices picks up your voice and wifi's it to your phone!
Also a small wi fi device plugs into the TV which allows you to control the volume of the sound into your hearing devices, in amazing stereo, without irritating anyone with normal hearing.
One can also adjust the "focus" of the hearing devices to allow you to cut out a noisy restaurant and focus on the person you are talking to!!
I have used them when flying with Lighspeed Zulus and they are fantastic.
Not cheap, but Medical Aid will pay for one ear so you buy one in December and the other in January!
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Re: Deaf Pilots?

Unread post by fcvanwyk » Sun Oct 07, 2018 6:36 am

I thought it would be good to copy and paste the latest SACAA standards for hearing. The first part is for Class 1, then Class 2 etc. There is provision made for proving the pilot can function even if the hearing is worse than the cut off hearing levels on the standard audiogram/pure tone audiometry. Any questions feel free to ask.

SOUTH AFRICAN CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY
CIVIL AVIATION ACT, 2009 (ACT NO. 13 OF 2009)
AMENDMENT SA CATS 4/2017
The Director of Civil Aviation has, in terms of section 163(1) of the Civil Aviation Act, 2009 (Act
No. 13 of 2009) read with Part 11 of the Civil Aviation Regulations, 2011 amended South
African Civil Aviation Technical Standards as reflected in the Schedule hereto. The
Amendment as contained in the Schedule shall come into operation on 8 September 2017.
Pop~ za
Director of Civil Aviation
Date: 0 4 SEP 2017
GENERAL EXPLANATORY NOTE:
[ ] Words in bold type in square brackets indicate omissions from existing technical
standards.
Words underlined with a solid line indicate insertions in existing technical
standards.
1
SCHEDULE
Table of contents
1. Amendment of Technical Standard 67.00.2
Amendment of Technical Standard 67.00.2
1. Technical Standard 67.00.2 is hereby amended by:
(a) the substitution in section 2 for subsection 1.3 of the following subsection:
"1.3 Ear, nose and throat and hearing standards
(1) Applicants must have no established medical history or clinical diagnosis
of the following:
(a) Any pathological process, acute or chronic, of the internal ear or middle
ear cavities;
(b) Any unhealed (unclosed) perforation of the tympanic membranes,
except that an applicant with a single dry perforation may be eligible for
a certificate if the defect does not prevent compliance with the hearing
standards;
( c) Any chronic or serious recurrent obstruction of the Eustachian tu bes;
(d) Any serious or recurrent disturbance of the vestibular system;
(e) Any obstruction to free nasal air entry to both sides;
(f) Any serious malformation, or serious acute or chronic condition of
the buccal cavity or upper respiratory tract;
(g) Any speech defect likely to interfere with the safe performance or duties
in exercising the privileges of the licence.
(2) Applicants must be free from any hearing defect, which would interfere
with the safe exercise of the privileges of the licence. [Routine audiometry
is required at each medical examination. Applicants must not have a
hearing loss in excess of 35 dB at each frequency between 500 and 2000
Hz, or 50 dB at 3000 Hz in either ear. Applicants failing to comply with
this standard in either ear may be assessed fit if the hearing loss
for both ears, when averaged at each frequency does not exceed
2
the stated limit, and the applicant achieves 90 percent or better
discrimination when speech audiometry is tested.]
(3) An applicant for a Class 1 medical certificate shall be tested by pure-tone
audiometry at first issue of the assessment. not less than once every five years
up to the age of 40 years. and thereafter not less than once every two years,
alternatively, other methods providing equivalent results may be used.
(4)
(5)
An applicant shall demonstrate a hearing performance sufficient for the safe
exercise of his or her licence and rating privileges. At medical intervals
prescribed in subsection (3), where audiometry is not performed, an applicant
shall be tested in a quiet room by whispered and spoken voice test.
For the purpose of a hearing test-
(a)
(b)
a quiet room is a room in which intensity of background noise is less
than 35db (A); and
the sound level of an average conversational voice at 1 m from the point
of output (lower lip of the speakers) is c.60dB (A) and that of a
whispered voice c.45dB (A). at 2cm from the speaker; the sound level is
6 dB (A) lower.
(6) The pure-tone audiometry shall be calibrated according to the standard of the
current audiometric test method.
(7) An applicant who is unable to hear an average conversational voice in a quiet
room, using both ears, at a distance of 2m from the examiner and with the
back turned to the examiner, shall be assessed as unfit.
(8) When tested by pure-tone audiometry, an applicant with a hearing loss in either
ear separatel y, of more than 35 dB at any of the frequencies 500, 1 000 or 2
000 Hz, or more than 50 dB at 3 000 Hz, shall be assessed as unfit.
(9) An applicant with a hearing loss greater than the one prescribed in subsection
(8) may be declared fit provided that the applicant has normal hearing
performance against a background noise that reproduces or simulates the
masking properties of flight deck noise upon speech and beacon signals.
(10) Despite the provisions of subsection (5), the background noise shall be
3
representative of the noise in the cockpit of the type of aircraft for which the
applicant's licence and ratings are valid.
(11) In the speech material for discrimination testing, both aviation relevant phrases
and phonetically balanced words shall be used. Alternatively, a practical hearing
test conducted in flight in the cockpit of an aircraft of the type for which the
applicant's licence and ratings are valid may be used.";
(b) the substitution in section 3 for subsection 2.3 of the following subsection:
"2.3 Ear, nose and throat and hearing standards
( 1) Applicants must have no established medical history or clinical diagnosis
of the following:
(a) Any pathological process, acute or chronic, of the internal ear or middle
ear cavities;
(b) any unhealed (unclosed) perforation of the tympanic membranes, except
that an applicant with a single dry perforation may be eligible for a
certificate if the defect does not prevent compliance with the hearing
standards;
( c) any chronic or serious recurrent obstruction of the eustachian tubes;
(d) any serious or recurrent disturbance of the vestibular system;
(e) any obstruction to free nasal air entry to both sides;
(f) any serious malformation, or serious acute or chronic condition of
the buccal cavity or upper respiratory tract;
(g) any speech defect likely to interfere with the safe performance or duties in
exercising the privileges of the licence.
(2) Applicants must be free from any hearing defect which would interfere with the
safe exercise of the privileges of the licence.
(3) [Pilots with a private pilot licence instrument rating must have routine
audiometry. Applicants must not have a hearing loss in excess of 35dB at
each frequency between 500 and 2000Hz, or 50dB at 3000Hz, in either ear.
Applicants failing to comply with this standard in either ear may be
assessed fit if the hearing loss for both ears, when averaged at each
frequency, does not exceed the stated limit, and the applicant achieves 90
per cent or better discrimination when speech audiometry is tested.] An
applicant for Class 2 medical certificate shall be tested by pure-tone audiometry
at first issue of the assessment and , after the age of 50 years. not less than
4
once every two years.
(4) An applicant shall demonstrate a hearing performance sufficient for the safe
exercise of their licence and rating privileges. At medical intervals prescribed in
subsection (3), where audiometry is not performed, an applicant shall be tested
in a quiet room by whispered and spoken voice test.
(5) For the purpose of a hearing test -
(a) a quiet room is a room in which intensity of background noise is less than
35db (A); and
(b) the sound level of an average conversational voice at 1m from the point
of output (lower lip of the speakers) is c.60dB (A) and that of a whispered
voice c.45dB (A), at 2cm from the speaker: the sound level is 6 dB {A)
lower.
(6) The pure-tone audiometry shall be calibrated according to the standard of the
current audiometric test method.
(7) An applicant who is unable to hear an average conversational voice in a quiet
room, using both ears, at a distance of 2m from the examiner and with the back
turned to the examiner, shall be assessed as unfit.
.(fil When tested by pure-tone audiometry, an applicant with a hearing loss in either
ear separately, of more than 35 dB at any of the frequencies 500, 1 000 or 2 000
Hz, or more than 50 dB at 3 000 Hz, shall be assessed as unfit.
(9) An applicant with a hearing loss greater than the one prescribed in subsection (8)
may be declared fit provided that the applicant has normal hearing
performance against a background noise that reproduces or simulates the
masking properties of flight deck noise upon speech and beacon signals.
(10) Despite the provisions of subsection (5), the background noise shall be
representative of the noise in the cockpit of the type of aircraft for which the
applicant's licence and ratings are valid.
(11) In the speech material for discrimination testing, both aviation relevant phrases
and phonetically balanced words shall be used.";
(c) the substitution in section 4 for subsection 3.3 of the following subsection:
5
"3.3 Ear, nose and throat and hearing standards
(1) Applicants must have no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of the
following-
(a) any pathological process, acute or chronic, of the internal ear or middle
ear cavities;
(b) any unhealed (unclosed) perforation of the tympanic membranes, except
that an applicant with a single dry perforation may be eligible for a
certificate if the defect does not prevent compliance with the hearing
standards;
(c) any serious or recurrent disturbance of the vestibular system;
(d) any serious malformation, or serious acute or chronic condition of the
buccal cavity or upper respiratory tract; or
(e) any speech defect likely to interfere with the safe performance of duties in
exercising the privileges of the licence.
(2) Applicants must be free from any hearing defect which would interfere with the
safe exercise of the privileges of the licence. [Routine audiometry is required
at each medical examination. Applicants must not have a hearing loss in
excess of 35dB at each frequency between 500 and 2000Hz, or 50dB at
3000Hz, in either ear. Applicants failing to comply with this standard in
either ear may be assessed fit if the hearing loss for both ears, when
averaged at each frequency does not exceed the stated limit, and the
applicant achieves 90 per cent or better discrimination when speech
audiometry is tested.]
(3) An applicant for a Class 3 medical certificate shall be tested by pure-tone
audiometry at first issue of the assessment, not less than once every four years
up to the age of 40 years. and thereafter not less than once every two years.
Alternativel y. other methods providing equivalent results may be used.
(4) An applicant shall demonstrate a hearing performance sufficient for the safe
exercise of his or her licence and rating privileges. At medical intervals
prescribed in subsection (3). where audiometry is not performed. applicants
shall be tested in a quiet room by whispered and spoken voice test.
(5) For the purpose of a hearing test -
(a) a quiet room is a room in which intensity of background noise is less than
6
35db(A);
(b) the sound level of an average conversational voice at 1 m from the point
of output (lower lip of the speakers) is c.60dB (A) and that of a whispered
voice c.45dB (A), at 2cm from the speaker; the sound level is 6 dB (A)
lower.
(6) The pure-tone audiometry shall be calibrated as per the standard of the current
audiometric test method.
(7) When tested by pure-tone audiometry, an applicant with a hearing loss in
either ear separatel y, of more than 35 dB at any of the frequencies 5001 1 000
or 2 000 Hz, or more than 50 dB at 3 000 Hz, shall be assessed as unfit.
(8) An applicant with a hearing loss greater than the one prescribed in subsection
(7) may be declared fit provided that the applicant has normal hearing
performance against a background noise that reproduces or simulates that
experienced in a typical air traffic control working environment.
(9) The frequency composition of the background noise is defined only to the
extent that the frequency range 600 to 4 800 Hz (speech frequency range) is
adequately represented.
(10) In the speech material for discrimination testing, both aviation-relevant phrases
and phonetically balanced words are normally used. Alternatively, a practical
hearing test conducted in an air traffic control environment representative of the
one for which the applicant's licence and ratings are valid may be used.".
7

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