SAA after Business rescue

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Re: SAA after Business rescue

Unread post by GL » Fri Jun 03, 2022 3:42 pm

SAA INCREASES CAPACITY TO MEET DEMAND
Johannesburg (2 June 2022) – South African Airways (SAA) notes the unfortunate decision by Comair to voluntarily suspend all flights, effective 1 June 2022.
SAA’s Interim Chairperson and Chief Executive, Prof John Lamola says, “Having emerged from business rescue ourselves, we empathize with Comair and understand the difficulties caused by COVID and high fuel prices.
“The team at SAA has been working hard to find solutions to help affected customers, and is in the process of adjusting our flying programme to adding more seats between Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban. We are also looking at options to help customers on other routes serviced by SAA, adds Lamola.
SAA will increase frequencies were possible and use existing capacity to meet customer demand. Kindly check our social media platforms and website for the latest information.
SAA advises all customers that the airline’s normal pricing structure remains in place, and during demand periods lower fares are naturally taken up first. Customers can access updated flight schedules on www.flysaa.com
What if humanity is the disease and Covid-19 the cure?
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Re: SAA after Business rescue

Unread post by African Flyer » Fri Jun 03, 2022 4:51 pm

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Re: SAA after Business rescue

Unread post by jbayfan » Sat Jun 04, 2022 8:27 am

African Flyer wrote:
Fri Jun 03, 2022 4:51 pm
Returning
I don’t understand the significance of this post??
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Re: SAA after Business rescue

Unread post by Volo » Sat Jun 04, 2022 8:50 am

GL wrote:
Fri Jun 03, 2022 3:42 pm
SAA INCREASES CAPACITY TO MEET DEMAND
Johannesburg (2 June 2022) – South African Airways (SAA) notes the unfortunate decision by Comair to voluntarily suspend all flights, effective 1 June 2022.
SAA’s Interim Chairperson and Chief Executive, Prof John Lamola says, “Having emerged from business rescue ourselves, we empathize with Comair and understand the difficulties caused by COVID and high fuel prices.
“The team at SAA has been working hard to find solutions to help affected customers, and is in the process of adjusting our flying programme to adding more seats between Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban. We are also looking at options to help customers on other routes serviced by SAA, adds Lamola.
SAA will increase frequencies were possible and use existing capacity to meet customer demand. Kindly check our social media platforms and website for the latest information.
SAA advises all customers that the airline’s normal pricing structure remains in place, and during demand periods lower fares are naturally taken up first. Customers can access updated flight schedules on www.flysaa.com
..........................
I shouldnt be , but I am astounded at the gall of SAA saying they wont take advantage of Comairs withdrawal from the market .
We all know that they can charge what they like hi or low because one way or another an executive decision has ensured that they are funded to compete unfairly by not having to conform to the strictures of company law.
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Re: SAA after Business rescue

Unread post by African Flyer » Sun Jun 05, 2022 7:54 pm

jbayfan wrote:
Sat Jun 04, 2022 8:27 am
African Flyer wrote:
Fri Jun 03, 2022 4:51 pm
Returning
I don’t understand the significance of this post??
Simply showing the aircraft returning after being stuck on the ground for 40 hours on what's normally a turn around flight
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Re: SAA after Business rescue

Unread post by Christo » Thu Jun 23, 2022 8:02 pm

Due to the price increase in ammunition, do not expect a warning shot.

Sig Sauer, kinda like Glock except for men. :wink:
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Re: SAA after Business rescue

Unread post by jbayfan » Mon Jun 27, 2022 7:23 am

Qantas just announced direct flights between Perth and Joburg. There goes the one possible international route SAA could have operated profitably. SAA is done as an international airline.
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Re: SAA after Business rescue

Unread post by evanb » Mon Jun 27, 2022 10:01 am

jbayfan wrote:
Mon Jun 27, 2022 7:23 am
Qantas just announced direct flights between Perth and Joburg. There goes the one possible international route SAA could have operated profitably. SAA is done as an international airline.
On what basis do we think JNB-PER was or could be profitable on SAA metal?

That said, Qantas is simply replacing capacity. The retirement of the B747-400 and replacement with the B787-9 on SYD-JNB has meant a dramatic reduction in capacity, and the 3x weekly PER-JNB is still less capacity than the loss on SYD-JNB. That said, a great move by QF to replace some of that capacity from a second hub.
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Re: SAA after Business rescue

Unread post by jbayfan » Mon Jun 27, 2022 10:48 am

evanb wrote:
Mon Jun 27, 2022 10:01 am
jbayfan wrote:
Mon Jun 27, 2022 7:23 am
Qantas just announced direct flights between Perth and Joburg. There goes the one possible international route SAA could have operated profitably. SAA is done as an international airline.
On what basis do we think JNB-PER was or could be profitable on SAA metal?

That said, Qantas is simply replacing capacity. The retirement of the B747-400 and replacement with the B787-9 on SYD-JNB has meant a dramatic reduction in capacity, and the 3x weekly PER-JNB is still less capacity than the loss on SYD-JNB. That said, a great move by QF to replace some of that capacity from a second hub.
I was simply saying that out of any past SAA route or any potential international route this is the only one where they would have had no competition as a non-stop route. Not saying it would be profitable.
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Re: SAA after Business rescue

Unread post by evanb » Mon Jun 27, 2022 12:37 pm

jbayfan wrote:
Mon Jun 27, 2022 10:48 am
I was simply saying that out of any past SAA route or any potential international route this is the only one where they would have had no competition as a non-stop route. Not saying it would be profitable.
Fair enough, although they had plenty of routes with no non-stop competition over the years that they couldn't make work.
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Re: SAA after Business rescue

Unread post by jbayfan » Tue Jun 28, 2022 8:11 am

Copy and pasted.

This is a serious story. Assisted by journalists and industry experts we have conducted significant research prior to making this report. We requested comment or acknowledgement on the matter from both South African Airways 2.0 (who did not comment) and the SACAA (who acknowledged the matter after a week’s consideration and made limited comments).

The matter relates to SAA’s single Airbus A330-300, which operated a scheduled flight (SA052) from Johannesburg to Accra, Ghana on 14 April ‘22. That flight operated on schedule and the aircraft was due operate the return flight to Johannesburg 90 minutes later. This flight did not operate; it was significantly postponed.

SAA had recently prior to this date contracted with a new fuel supplier in Accra. During the refueling in Accra, on the night of 14 April, events occurred which led to a concern that the fuel pumped into the SAA Airbus was significantly contaminated. Tests were made and it was discovered that a significant amount of water was in the fuel which was supplied in Accra.

The flight was postponed and engineering action was taken to purge the contaminating water from the aircraft fuel system. At 15:20 the following day, 15 April ‘22, the aircraft departed Accra, operating under the callsign SA9053, the prefix indicating that it was operating out of the normal schedule. The aircraft carried a commercial load of passengers and cargo and was under the command of Captain Vusi Khumalo, who many of you will remember, was the Captain who was in command of the Brussels vaccine flight, which encountered the Alpha Floor event, on takeoff from Johannesburg. Captain Khumalo had recently been hired back into SAA, after having left not long before, on a golden parachute voluntary severance package (VSP); a process which has never been explained in financial terms. He was hired back into SAA as the Head of Training, for their Air Training Organisation, despite the fact that Captain Khumalo has no previous training experience.

What, you may ask, could possibly go wrong?

A number of hours into the flight, well into the night, the aircraft was at Flight Level (FL)410, north of Gaberone, when both engines started surging, in an uncommanded manner. The crew followed the non-normal procedures and made a request to the Gaberone ATC control to descend to a lower altitude. The aircraft descended to FL190 and continued on to Johannesburg. Air Traffic Control in Johannesburg provided radar vectors to the crew and the aircraft made a straight-in approach and landing onto Runway 21 Right at 22:49 on 15 April. The engines continued to surge, in an uncommanded manner, during the approach.

Once the passengers, luggage and cargo was off-loaded the aircraft was towed to the South African Airways Technical (SAAT) area for further investigation. Significant water contamination of the fuel system and engines was found. The fuel pumps were damaged, to the extent that they all required replacement.

It took SAAT over a month to properly purge the fuel system and engines and to replace the fuel pumps. The aircraft next operated from Johannesburg to Mauritius on 18 May and has been in regular service since then.

It appears, from reports in Accra, that it was only the SAA aircraft which was affected by the contaminated fuel.

Of significant, subsequent concern, is that it was only on 25 April 2022 that the SACAA came to learn of this serious incident. In fact such report to the SACAA, appears to have come from the Ghanaian Civil Aviation Authority and there is no confirmation that SAA ever reported this incident to the SACAA.

The SACAA is of the firm opinion that “Ghana is the State of Occurence, and therefore, they will be responsible for the investigation under Annex 13.” The SACAA have further said that they have initiated an Annex 19 investigation “which may be escalated to an investigation under Section 73 of the Civil Aviation Act.

” The SACAA have furthermore advised that “this investigation is however still underway and that the SACAA will not publish a report for this kind of investigation.” It will simply be kept internal and swept under the carpet in my humble opinion.

That’s it according to the SACAA; they have suggested that if we require further information we should contact the AIB in Ghana.

Over my dead body.

A large South African airliner, operating a commercial flight, with known contamination of the fuel system, experiences uncommanded engine surges for an extended period of flight, including the approach and landing, with subsequent investigation finding still-existing contamination of the fuel system and engines, with significant damage to the fuel pumps. The airline does not report the matter to the regulatory authority anywhere near as expeditiously as they are required, possibly never having made such report and the regulatory authority fobs off the entire responsibility to the (Ghanaian)aviation authority where the contaminant was introduced, but not where the issue arose or where the aircraft thankfully landed. Or the state of registry. I think that’s about it.

I’m unconcerned as to the repairs affected or the current status of the aircraft; I’m deeply concerned that, once again, if it wasn’t for concerned <<moderated - language>>-stirrers like me, this cover-up would have been a complete success. No-one outside of those implicated would know about it.

Does anyone really give a <<moderated - language>>?
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Re: SAA after Business rescue

Unread post by African Flyer » Thu Jul 07, 2022 8:03 pm

Another trip 🇨🇺
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Re: SAA after Business rescue

Unread post by Snitch » Mon Jul 11, 2022 12:17 am

On her way back direct
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Re: SAA after Business rescue

Unread post by Fransw » Mon Jul 11, 2022 9:10 am

Not directly related, maybe just a little...https://www.moneyweb.co.za/news/south-a ... c15efdc25c
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Re: SAA after Business rescue

Unread post by MadMacs » Mon Jul 11, 2022 9:43 am

jbayfan wrote:
Tue Jun 28, 2022 8:11 am
Copy and pasted.

This is a serious story. Assisted by journalists and industry experts we have conducted significant research prior to making this report. We requested comment or acknowledgement on the matter from both South African Airways 2.0 (who did not comment) and the SACAA (who acknowledged the matter after a week’s consideration and made limited comments).

The matter relates to SAA’s single Airbus A330-300, which operated a scheduled flight (SA052) from Johannesburg to Accra, Ghana on 14 April ‘22. That flight operated on schedule and the aircraft was due operate the return flight to Johannesburg 90 minutes later. This flight did not operate; it was significantly postponed.

SAA had recently prior to this date contracted with a new fuel supplier in Accra. During the refueling in Accra, on the night of 14 April, events occurred which led to a concern that the fuel pumped into the SAA Airbus was significantly contaminated. Tests were made and it was discovered that a significant amount of water was in the fuel which was supplied in Accra.

The flight was postponed and engineering action was taken to purge the contaminating water from the aircraft fuel system. At 15:20 the following day, 15 April ‘22, the aircraft departed Accra, operating under the callsign SA9053, the prefix indicating that it was operating out of the normal schedule. The aircraft carried a commercial load of passengers and cargo and was under the command of Captain Vusi Khumalo, who many of you will remember, was the Captain who was in command of the Brussels vaccine flight, which encountered the Alpha Floor event, on takeoff from Johannesburg. Captain Khumalo had recently been hired back into SAA, after having left not long before, on a golden parachute voluntary severance package (VSP); a process which has never been explained in financial terms. He was hired back into SAA as the Head of Training, for their Air Training Organisation, despite the fact that Captain Khumalo has no previous training experience.

What, you may ask, could possibly go wrong?

A number of hours into the flight, well into the night, the aircraft was at Flight Level (FL)410, north of Gaberone, when both engines started surging, in an uncommanded manner. The crew followed the non-normal procedures and made a request to the Gaberone ATC control to descend to a lower altitude. The aircraft descended to FL190 and continued on to Johannesburg. Air Traffic Control in Johannesburg provided radar vectors to the crew and the aircraft made a straight-in approach and landing onto Runway 21 Right at 22:49 on 15 April. The engines continued to surge, in an uncommanded manner, during the approach.

Once the passengers, luggage and cargo was off-loaded the aircraft was towed to the South African Airways Technical (SAAT) area for further investigation. Significant water contamination of the fuel system and engines was found. The fuel pumps were damaged, to the extent that they all required replacement.

It took SAAT over a month to properly purge the fuel system and engines and to replace the fuel pumps. The aircraft next operated from Johannesburg to Mauritius on 18 May and has been in regular service since then.

It appears, from reports in Accra, that it was only the SAA aircraft which was affected by the contaminated fuel.

Of significant, subsequent concern, is that it was only on 25 April 2022 that the SACAA came to learn of this serious incident. In fact such report to the SACAA, appears to have come from the Ghanaian Civil Aviation Authority and there is no confirmation that SAA ever reported this incident to the SACAA.

The SACAA is of the firm opinion that “Ghana is the State of Occurence, and therefore, they will be responsible for the investigation under Annex 13.” The SACAA have further said that they have initiated an Annex 19 investigation “which may be escalated to an investigation under Section 73 of the Civil Aviation Act.

” The SACAA have furthermore advised that “this investigation is however still underway and that the SACAA will not publish a report for this kind of investigation.” It will simply be kept internal and swept under the carpet in my humble opinion.

That’s it according to the SACAA; they have suggested that if we require further information we should contact the AIB in Ghana.

Over my dead body.

A large South African airliner, operating a commercial flight, with known contamination of the fuel system, experiences uncommanded engine surges for an extended period of flight, including the approach and landing, with subsequent investigation finding still-existing contamination of the fuel system and engines, with significant damage to the fuel pumps. The airline does not report the matter to the regulatory authority anywhere near as expeditiously as they are required, possibly never having made such report and the regulatory authority fobs off the entire responsibility to the (Ghanaian)aviation authority where the contaminant was introduced, but not where the issue arose or where the aircraft thankfully landed. Or the state of registry. I think that’s about it.

I’m unconcerned as to the repairs affected or the current status of the aircraft; I’m deeply concerned that, once again, if it wasn’t for concerned <<moderated - language>>-stirrers like me, this cover-up would have been a complete success. No-one outside of those implicated would know about it.

Does anyone really give a <<moderated - language>>?
Have you got a link for this please?
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