Titanic still hides secrets.

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Titanic still hides secrets.

Unread post by dany » Fri Apr 19, 2019 1:18 pm

Interesting facts coming out while doing research on Titanic.

https://youtu.be/wJFexcm5bEI
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Re: Titanic still hide secrets.

Unread post by vanjast » Sat Apr 20, 2019 1:43 am

Interesting focus... I'm still in doubt whether they're correct in it's entirety, as they draw no comparison to modern day techniques, and even if this is relevant.
But I'm sure in that day, 1912, the shock of the sinking would set any CEO/company into pandemonium, and polititians are... polititians.
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Re: Titanic still hide secrets.

Unread post by dany » Sat Apr 20, 2019 5:07 pm

The interesting part of this is that not many looked into the actual design of the vessels at the time. Remember, expansion joints in vessels was in its infant state at the time. Yet, same fate claimed a lot of liberty vessel,although most blame it on bad workmanship,faulty and inferior materials. To go down with a expedition and hunt this down was a mayor achievement on its town.
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Re: Titanic still hide secrets.

Unread post by Goldfinger » Wed May 01, 2019 8:52 pm

Interesting , however I wouldn’t put so much emphasis on the expansion joints. RMS Olympic , Titanics older Sister ship served with distinction and had such a reputation that she was referred to as “Old Reliable”.
Titanic A Promenade deck was closed in as Olympics was open. So small improvements were made to Titanic from when the Olympic Was built. RMS Olympic only had major safety improvements done to her after the sinking of Titanic.
So what I am trying to to say is that firstly you can’t compare a ship riveted together 100 years ago with modern ship building technology and strengths and secondly he Olympic class ships were designed and strong enough for what their mission.
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Re: Titanic still hide secrets.

Unread post by kudu177 » Thu May 09, 2019 12:45 pm

Goldfinger wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 8:52 pm
Interesting , however I wouldn’t put so much emphasis on the expansion joints. RMS Olympic , Titanics older Sister ship served with distinction and had such a reputation that she was referred to as “Old Reliable”.
Agree fully.

If Titanic had hit that iceberg head on, likely the worst outcome would have been a heavily crushed bow and massively dented egos for the company, the builders and the directors of the White Star Line, and the event would have been little more than a footnote in history.

Same goes had the ship actually been carrying enough lifeboats for all on board.

In the time it took her to sink, there was enough time to get everybody away in lifeboats, in utterly calm conditions with almost no list until the end. Compare that to the Lusitania which sank in 20 minutes and with such a profound list that the starboard boats could not be lowered ...

An interesting footnote to the Titanic is the tale of Violet Jessop, a stewardess who survived the sinking. Three years later, Jessop was working as nurse aboard the Titanic's other sister, Brittanic, which had been commandeered to serve as a hospital ship during WW1, when it was torpedoed in the Mediterranean.

Jessop was fighting for her life in the sea when the Brittanic made its final plunge, suffering a blow to the head from the keel as the ship went down.

She survived. :D

EDITED to correct Jessop's first name: Violet, not Victoria.
Last edited by kudu177 on Fri May 10, 2019 11:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Titanic still hide secrets.

Unread post by Fransw » Thu May 09, 2019 12:54 pm

kudu177 wrote:
Thu May 09, 2019 12:45 pm
Goldfinger wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 8:52 pm
Interesting , however I wouldn’t put so much emphasis on the expansion joints. RMS Olympic , Titanics older Sister ship served with distinction and had such a reputation that she was referred to as “Old Reliable”.
Agree fully.

If Titanic had hit that iceberg head on, likely the worst outcome would have been a heavily crushed bow and massively dented egos for the company, the builders and the directors of the White Star Line, and the event would have been little more than a footnote in history.

Same goes had the ship actually been carrying enough lifeboats for all on board.

In the time it took her to sink, there was enough time to get everybody away in lifeboats, in utterly calm conditions with almost no list until the end. Compare that to the Lusitania which sank in 20 minutes and with such a profound list that the starboard boats could not be lowered ...

An interesting footnote to the Titanic is the tale of Victoria Jessop, a stewardess who survived the sinking. Three years later, Jessop was working as nurse aboard the Titanic's other sister, Brittanic, which had been commandeered to serve as a hospital ship during WW1, when it was torpedoed in the Mediterranean.

Jessop was fighting for her life in the sea when the Brittanic made its final plunge, suffering a blow to the head from the keel as the ship went down.

She survived. :D
Kudu,your first paragraph.. I think if the Titanic had hit the iceberg head on the results would have been far worse. Imagine all that momentum hitting a solid brick wall! I think it would have crushed half of the ship..

But let's ask the scientist @Iceberg :wink: and @Heisan and the rest..
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Re: Titanic still hide secrets.

Unread post by Jack Welles » Thu May 09, 2019 1:18 pm

Fransw wrote:
Thu May 09, 2019 12:54 pm
But let's ask the scientist @Iceberg :wink: and @Heisan and the rest..
Especially "Iceberg" seems appropriate under the circumstances =D> :lol:
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Re: Titanic still hide secrets.

Unread post by Fransw » Thu May 09, 2019 1:33 pm

Jack Welles wrote:
Thu May 09, 2019 1:18 pm
Fransw wrote:
Thu May 09, 2019 12:54 pm
But let's ask the scientist @Iceberg :wink: and @Heisan and the rest..
Especially "Iceberg" seems appropriate under the circumstances =D> :lol:
Yes! Iceberg, where were you on the 15th of April 1912!? :?
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Re: Titanic still hide secrets.

Unread post by Iceberg » Thu May 09, 2019 2:27 pm

Fransw wrote:
Thu May 09, 2019 1:33 pm
Jack Welles wrote:
Thu May 09, 2019 1:18 pm
Fransw wrote:
Thu May 09, 2019 12:54 pm
But let's ask the scientist @Iceberg :wink: and @Heisan and the rest..
Especially "Iceberg" seems appropriate under the circumstances =D> :lol:
Yes! Iceberg, where were you on the 15th of April 1912!? :?
Ha Ha, I was just a quantum probability of being born sometime later then … , as was my quantum entangled twin. :wink:

The maximum speed of the Titanic was only 23 knots. Let's assume it was doing a fine 20 knots.
Not that fast. If you hit something in your car or aircraft at that speed you will probably walk away unscathed and the car/aircraft will be repairable. So scaling up to the Titanic. Yes the mass was huge, but so was the hull that had to absorb that momentum/energy by crumpling, slowing it from 20 to 0 knots. Icebreakers regularly crush ice easily - so an iceberg is not like a brick wall to a pointed bow - the ice would have absorbed much of the energy as well by shattering and breaking.

The above is just a general sort of ball park feeling of it. I don't have the technical data and have not made any complicated sums... :)
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