Windfarm blades to be buried in landfill

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Windfarm blades to be buried in landfill

Unread post by Ugly Duckling » Thu Sep 26, 2019 7:21 am

900 blades to be buried in landfill. :shock:

What is the lifespan of a wind turbine :?:

https://www.wyomingnewsnow.tv/content/n ... 07701.html
Casper Regional Landfill begins burying turbine blades

By Kody Allen | Posted: Wed 3:06 PM, Sep 18, 2019

CASPER, Wyo. (Wyoming News Now) One wind farm in Glenrock and two from the Saratoga area have partnered with the Casper Regional Landfill to dispose of their old wind turbine blades.

More than 900 blades will be brought to the landfill beginning now until the end of next spring.

The Casper Solid Waste Manager, Cynthia Langston, said that though most turbine blades can be reused, there are some that are simply un-recyclable.

"Ninety percent of the turbines are completely reclaimed, recycled, and reused, but there is ten percent that is fiberglass, so those are coming to us from three different farms in the state."

Langston said that though the motor houses can be crushed, the blades are too strong.

To save space, they cut each blade into three separate parts before transporting them, then stack them on each other to be buried.

Langston said that Casper was the only facility in the region that could handle such a project.

"So Casper happens to be, I think it is, the biggest landfill facility in the state of Wyoming. These blades are really big, and they take up a lot of airspace, and our unlined area is very, very large, and it's going to last hundreds of years."

She also mentioned that Casper is the only landfill in the state that has the certification to show that it is environmentally responsible, but being conscious for the Earth isn't the only reason Casper decided to bring the project to the city.

They are making a pretty large profit from the deal; $675,485 to be exact.

"So the revenue from the special projects, um, that go in the unlined area, help with the whole cost of our facility so it keeps all of our rates low. Helping with the revenue source, so absolutely, we're making money on it."

Keeping prices low is important to the CRL, as they are the lowest price landfill in the state, much in thanks to these types of special projects.

Expect to see more blades come to the landfill at least until the end of next spring as more turbines are replaced or decommissioned.
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Re: Windfarm blades to be buried in landfill

Unread post by rare bird » Thu Sep 26, 2019 10:13 pm

not much you can do with glass fibre composite once it has de-laminated.
blades that I have seen have been given a 20 year lifespan (some with a 10 year warranty - depending who the operator is and what the contract says) and can be extended by on-condition monitoring. my 2cents of inexperience on them (I did do the inspection course with SGS about 9 years ago) is that they are quite difficult to detect faults (not straight forward ultrasonic NDT - most of it relies on tapping it to hear if it sounds hollow! ) but there are other items too - eg the nose cone and nacelle components too. (and not to mention any defect blades that are scrapped during production)

Other items that are difficult to dispose are composite munitions - or donate them to a museum? eg the ballistic missile launcher (RSA3 / Jericho ii ) in Swartkops museum?
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Re: Windfarm blades to be buried in landfill

Unread post by V5 - LEO » Fri Sep 27, 2019 4:22 pm

....hopefully they gonna chop them up in smal (ler) bits before burying them - that way earth will recycle them a tad quicker.
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Re: Windfarm blades to be buried in landfill

Unread post by JCA » Fri Sep 27, 2019 10:38 pm

Jeez.... can you imagine what Greta is going to say? How dare you? =D> =D>
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Re: Windfarm blades to be buried in landfill

Unread post by Darren » Sun Sep 29, 2019 6:04 pm

JCA wrote:
Fri Sep 27, 2019 10:38 pm
Jeez.... can you imagine what Greta is going to say? How dare you? =D> =D>
That's illogical, and off-topic. All power generation technology, whether coal or gas-based, nuclear, wind, or solar, has waste elements that are not easily or economically recyclable. Wind turbine blades are no worse in this regard than the others, especially as buried composites are non-toxic, and the same problem with recycling composites is probably going to pop up when the first sets of airliners with large composite substructures head to the scrapyard.

We already have a global warming thread. Let's not derail this one please.
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Re: Windfarm blades to be buried in landfill

Unread post by cage » Sun Sep 29, 2019 6:41 pm

There are a number of initiatives underway to deal with the large number of first generation turbines being decomissioned.
The most common use is to recycle as part of cement for construction.
Newer generation blades and technology have improved and designers and engineers have a focus on sustainability, as they should.
There are more options than just dumping in a landfill.
In years to come, recycling of these older turbines will create new business opportunities and jobs because people are applying their mind to the problem.
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Re: Windfarm blades to be buried in landfill

Unread post by cage » Sun Sep 29, 2019 6:58 pm

Just to add, as it’s related.
A lot of work is going into incorporating recycled plastic into asphalt.
The first stretch of road is being laid in KZN to test its ability to last in our warm climate.
There are people far smarter than us working on practical solutions to problems, they’re not illogically poo-pooing attempts to make things better because the answer isn’t 100% effective.
Everything has a cost, the only difference is how much and how long we have to keep paying for it.
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Re: Windfarm blades to be buried in landfill

Unread post by Lazy duck » Sun Sep 29, 2019 7:36 pm

Recycling fiber glass has to like recycling asbestos, dangerous and expensive . Guess a turbine footprint is getting bigger.
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Re: Windfarm blades to be buried in landfill

Unread post by cage » Sun Sep 29, 2019 8:04 pm

Lazy duck wrote:
Sun Sep 29, 2019 7:36 pm
Recycling fiber glass has to like recycling asbestos, dangerous and expensive . Guess a turbine footprint is getting bigger.
They are quite different which is why one is illegal and other isn’t.
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Re: Windfarm blades to be buried in landfill

Unread post by V5 - LEO » Sun Sep 29, 2019 8:11 pm

....well this is just a wild guess from my side but mother earth has a few tricks up her sleeve given the right circumstances. With the right pressure, time and heat she can make a diamond from coal (carbon). So I presume the clever guys do prepare these blades (and other stuff - hopefully) for mother earth to "consume and transform" to our benefit?
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Re: Windfarm blades to be buried in landfill

Unread post by Lazy duck » Sun Sep 29, 2019 10:29 pm

Legal or not Cage, go breath in a dust cloud of glass. Why would it cost so much to dispose of?
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Re: Windfarm blades to be buried in landfill

Unread post by rare bird » Mon Sep 30, 2019 10:36 am

cage wrote:
Sun Sep 29, 2019 6:58 pm
Just to add, as it’s related.
A lot of work is going into incorporating recycled plastic into asphalt.
The first stretch of road is being laid in KZN to test its ability to last in our warm climate.
There are people far smarter than us working on practical solutions to problems, they’re not illogically poo-pooing attempts to make things better because the answer isn’t 100% effective.
Everything has a cost, the only difference is how much and how long we have to keep paying for it.
one of the first trials of rubber tyres in bitumen/asphalt was the RWY at FAEL.
it worked sort of ok, but the rubber "krummeltjies" tended to tear out where the a/c turned and the tyres "srcubbed" / scuffed the RWY surface.

the use of rubber from tyres in the cement industry was also ok but not a raving success. I was only privy to the trials done at Riebeek Wes ( they tested dried sewerage sludge as well as tyres, in different trials) - the problem with the rubber was that it did not carry the heat through the length of the kiln. the positive was the added iron from the steel wire in the tyres (apart from limestone, shale, gypsum (to prevent flash setting) and iron as a catalyst are part of the recipe / formulation for Portland cement). The sewerage sludge did not really have enough calorific value, and the added health hassles & registrations/waste licenses etc was not worth it for that application. Better used as fertiliser than fuel.

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