C210 wing spar failure in Aus : C177 inspection recommended as well

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TOFFS
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Re: C210 wing spar failure in Aus : C177 inspection recommended as well

Unread post by TOFFS » Sat Jul 13, 2019 9:57 am

I have had the first two aircraft in to conduct the Mandatory Service Letter which I posted somewhere above - a 210 and a 177RG.

This inspection is a far more in-depth inspection than any requested by Cessna or the Authorities before this. Within the instructions they have mapped out a route for the NDTs eddy current stylus to follow thoroughly covering the entire lower surface of the carry through spar.

Although the 177 was still literally decades away from having to comply, the roof lining was down for other other work so the owner requested I do this.

The 210 has a skin of impact foam glued to the lower surface to stop direct impact with occupants heads. This first had to be removed and the surface cleaned prior to the eddy current NDT.

Both aircraft were found with corrosion pits. Luckily enough, well within Cessna's repair scheme so after being polished out and re-tested they were both given a clean bill of health.

The worrying thing is that unless declared severe the 177 would have been 10,000 hours away from this inspection. This particular aircraft's history was well documented and could not have been classified as severe.

The area in question, because of sponge to protect heads, headliners with no easy way of access and no scheduled inspection is one of those black hole areas. It is strange that these Service Letters are only one time as the corrosion worms don't stop just because you have looked at them!

The CAA inspectors in Cape Town have expressed a great interest in this and have asked for reports on these and further aircraft.
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Re: C210 wing spar failure in Aus : C177 inspection recommended as well

Unread post by StressMerchant » Sat Jul 13, 2019 11:32 am

Was the sponge standard, or was it added by an operator afterwards?
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Re: C210 wing spar failure in Aus : C177 inspection recommended as well

Unread post by TOFFS » Sat Jul 13, 2019 11:53 am

StressMerchant wrote:
Sat Jul 13, 2019 11:32 am
Was the sponge standard, or was it added by an operator afterwards?
It was fitted by the Manufacturer to this and earlier models. Later ones have a different style roof lining and no foam.
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Cessna C210 and C177 AD RSA 2019-001

Unread post by moosp » Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:01 pm

Following on from the Mandatory Service Letter FAA SEL-57-06 and SEL-57-07 the SA CAA issued an AD on 26th August, (Their first for 2019 if the numbering is correct). In FAA land the FAA do not have the authority to demand compliance with a Service Letter, but as they put "Mandatory" on it you could see the way they were thinking, and SA CAA have (rightly in my opinion) made it an AD.

These SELs and now the SA CAA AD refer to the C210 accident in Australia where the carry through spar failed and the wing failed in flight.

The SEL needs a bit of reading and cross reference reading but it means that under SA regs you now have to refer to the FAA service letter and carry it out if applicable. For C177s it is unlikely that there will be aircraft here that are required to carry out the inspections, as the hours requirement are high, but it might be a good idea to get it done anyway to keep your insurer and a subsequent purchaser onside. I had it done on my C177 when the headlining was down for another reason and the maintenance actions were a relatively inexpensive assurance that there was no issue.

For the C210 there will be aircraft here which do require it. In fact for the hard life that many C210s have had here it may be required of many or most. You need to assess whether your aircraft has had "Severe" or "Typical" usage as defined according to Section 2A-10-00.
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Re: C210 wing spar failure in Aus : C177 inspection recommended as well

Unread post by GL » Fri Sep 13, 2019 7:12 am

Ferreira Aviation at Bloem Tempe have done an article on this AD in the Sept Issue of SA Flyer. They got in about 14 C210s at once. They describe the process necessary to get access to the spar and then the Eddy Current NDT - they brought a specialist in from JHB. Significantly one of the spars failed the test and had to be replaced - and just sourcing good parts will be a big problem.
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