Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

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Re: Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

Unread post by Ray W » Thu May 02, 2019 12:53 pm

Glad the folks are going to be OK - aeroplane not so good
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Re: Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

Unread post by antonvalks » Thu May 02, 2019 1:51 pm

What a shame! :( Such a special aircraft! Speedy recovery to the crew.
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Re: Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

Unread post by Multirotordronepilot » Thu May 02, 2019 2:16 pm

Thomas wrote:
Thu May 02, 2019 12:18 pm
Wow that seriously looks scary to see a fuselage just split apart so cleanly. As Volo mentioned where is the longitudinal strength? No longitudinal carbon fibre reinforcement? What if that came apart in severe turbulance? Would this mean the layout of the fibreglass was not done correctly?
I am not a specialist in fibreglass or strength of materials but this is worrying? Perhaps someone in the know could shed some light?
While I do not disagree with Volo or you that there could have been some longitudinal top hats or core sections in the laminate. There is nothing wrong with the design from a airworthiness point of view. Do so research into the aircrafts history and you will find it has more than proven itself as airworthy.

It is not easy to understand the loads at the point of impact by this could not have occurred due to turbulence which the aircraft should be operated in.

Additional strength could have presented use with a different wreckage but from an airworthiness perspective you need no longer be worried.
Aircraft built to survive a crash don't fly very well.
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Re: Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

Unread post by mnmodels » Thu May 02, 2019 2:23 pm

Multirotordronepilot wrote:
Thu May 02, 2019 2:16 pm
Thomas wrote:
Thu May 02, 2019 12:18 pm
Wow that seriously looks scary to see a fuselage just split apart so cleanly. As Volo mentioned where is the longitudinal strength? No longitudinal carbon fibre reinforcement? What if that came apart in severe turbulance? Would this mean the layout of the fibreglass was not done correctly?
I am not a specialist in fibreglass or strength of materials but this is worrying? Perhaps someone in the know could shed some light?
While I do not disagree with Volo or you that there could have been some longitudinal top hats or core sections in the laminate. There is nothing wrong with the design from a airworthiness point of view. Do so research into the aircrafts history and you will find it has more than proven itself as airworthy.

It is not easy to understand the loads at the point of impact by this could not have occurred due to turbulence which the aircraft should be operated in.

Additional strength could have presented use with a different wreckage but from an airworthiness perspective you need no longer be worried.
Aircraft built to survive a crash don't fly very well.
Very well said,

Composites are not alclad or 2024 material. It breaks like glass if the right forces are applied, even though they are 10 x stronger than metal....Aircraft are not design to fly after a crash....if the pilots wlaked away - thats good enough for me...

Rgds
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Re: Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

Unread post by Shaunus » Thu May 02, 2019 6:29 pm

Was it on 09 ... the runway camber midway can easy catch the unaware... its like a black hole sucking you down to the bushes.

Sad to see, all the best to the pilot and pax for a speedy recovery.

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Re: Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

Unread post by Rooster » Fri May 03, 2019 5:11 am

Shaunus wrote:
Thu May 02, 2019 6:29 pm
Was it on 09 ... the runway camber midway can easy catch the unaware... its like a black hole sucking you down to the bushes.
This comment is a misleading one in my opinion and may influence the speculation negatively.
Wings Park runways (although used at your own risk) are brilliant.
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Re: Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

Unread post by Shaunus » Fri May 03, 2019 8:04 am

Rooster wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 5:11 am
Shaunus wrote:
Thu May 02, 2019 6:29 pm
Was it on 09 ... the runway camber midway can easy catch the unaware... its like a black hole sucking you down to the bushes.
This comment is a misleading one in my opinion and may influence the speculation negatively.
Wings Park runways (although used at your own risk) are brilliant.
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Not meant to be at all Rooster. I have been to Wingspark a few times as I really enjoy the people and the field. And yes, the runways are brilliant. But a few of us (within my flying circles) have commented in the past about how the mid-way camber on 09 can potentially catch you out on take off. Its not an issue at all if you are aware, but if not you can easily find yourself drifting down to the bushes requiring positive left rudder to stay on track. I am amazed you don't find this as a strong potential point of speculation?
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Re: Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

Unread post by vlammie » Fri May 03, 2019 8:57 am

To me it look more like an aircraft that was airborne and then crashed than one that went off the runway? Any update on what happened? Speedy recovery to the occupants!
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Re: Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

Unread post by richard C » Fri May 03, 2019 9:04 am

vlammie wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 8:57 am
To me it look more like an aircraft that was airborne and then crashed than one that went off the runway? Any update on what happened? Speedy recovery to the occupants!
Looks like a cartwheel to me - the injuries sound right as well. Maybe a low-level wing drop and planting a wing tip ?
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Re: Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

Unread post by jimdavis » Fri May 03, 2019 9:11 am

vlammie wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 8:57 am
To me it look more like an aircraft that was airborne and then crashed than one that went off the runway? Any update on what happened? Speedy recovery to the occupants!
I understand that he did indeed lose directional control and tried to fly out of it before the aircraft was ready. It seems he stalled and dropped a wing. This is second hand info - but I believe it to be accurate.

I have not flown out of Wings Park, but I have indeed seen the slight camber. I must agree that if you have a twitchy aircraft on which you are not current, it could possibly add to your problems.

Out of interest, the heaviest bit of the aircraft will try to head down the camber. So if you have a nose wheel, the heaviest bit is at the front, and she will want to head down the camber. A taildragger will do the opposite - the tail will tend to move down the camber and the nose will point uphill.

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Re: Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

Unread post by MLyons » Fri May 03, 2019 9:14 am

jimdavis wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 9:11 am

Out of interest, the heaviest bit of the aircraft will try to head down the camber. So if you have a nose wheel, the heaviest bit is at the front, and she will want to head down the camber. A taildragger will do the opposite - the tail will tend to move down the camber and the nose will point uphill.

jim
Interesting Jim, thanks for the insight.
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Re: Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

Unread post by Beech55 » Fri May 03, 2019 9:41 am

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Re: Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

Unread post by Beech55 » Fri May 03, 2019 9:42 am

It’s the same aircraft.
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Re: Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

Unread post by ACE MAN » Fri May 03, 2019 9:49 am

MLyons wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 9:14 am
jimdavis wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 9:11 am

Out of interest, the heaviest bit of the aircraft will try to head down the camber. So if you have a nose wheel, the heaviest bit is at the front, and she will want to head down the camber. A taildragger will do the opposite - the tail will tend to move down the camber and the nose will point uphill.

jim
Interesting Jim, thanks for the insight.
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WRT - that’s assuming the tailwheel is on the ground?
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Re: Glasair Crash - Wings Park - 1 May 2019

Unread post by Shaunus » Fri May 03, 2019 10:23 am

ACE MAN wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 9:49 am
MLyons wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 9:14 am
jimdavis wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 9:11 am

Out of interest, the heaviest bit of the aircraft will try to head down the camber. So if you have a nose wheel, the heaviest bit is at the front, and she will want to head down the camber. A taildragger will do the opposite - the tail will tend to move down the camber and the nose will point uphill.

jim
Interesting Jim, thanks for the insight.
One learns little gems in between all the flack on this forum if one looks for them...…
WRT - that’s assuming the tailwheel is on the ground?
I would have agree with the tail wheel having to be on the ground, as my very first take off from Wingspark nearly ended up in a trip to the bushes in a taildragger. I had been offered my first flip in a Piper Cub after arriving in my Cubby, and was super excited and given control to do the takeoff in Cubby's bigger brother. I learnt a valuable lesson from the PIC that day as we started veering to the right, he said "If your plane is not going where you want it to, you stomp harder on the rudder pedals!" Being new to the plane, I was too gingerly on the rudder.
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