What is a "National Pilot's License"?

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What is a "National Pilot's License"?

Unread post by Steve »

Browsing through a recent local air mag, I came accross their page to subscribe.... Apart from asking the individuals personal details, there was a section to indicate their "interrest" in aviation - and of course ATP, COM, PPL, Helicoper and then "Microlight" was listed....

This is not the first time that we see so much confusion surrounding the various flying licenses in South Africa, that I thought it might be worth the effort to detail it in this thread and hopefully some may be enlightened...so here goes (and please feel free to comment if I get it wrong ;))

There are two legal license groups covered by our current regulaton - part 61 and part 62. The longest standing is part 61 which deals with PPL through to ATP and of course is ICAO compliant. Generally most folk fully understand and are aware of part 61, but are totally ingorant when it comes to part 62...

So part 62 covers the "National Pilot's License". Now just like in part 61 where we can have a helicopter PPL versus a fixed wing PPL, we have see license types under the NPL (National Pilot's License) - these types being as follows:-

* LSA - Lighty Sport Aircraft
* CCM - Conventionally Controlled Microlight
* WCM - Weight shift Controlled Microlight
* GYR - Gyrocopter

See: http://www.raasa.co.za/index.php/npl-requirements

Example of LSA requirements:
National Pilot License Requirements

Light Sport Aircraft - Subpart 16
Initial requirements
Minimum 35 hrs flying which must include;
Minimum 15 hrs solo
1 Dual Cross Country not less than 90 min
1 Solo Cross Country not less than 90 min
(Cross countries shall have at least 3 legs)
1 dual instruction flight in/out of controlled airport
Exams LSA
Skills test not less than 60 min with Grade A or B instructor which includes;
Navigation skills test not less than 90 minutes which includes 1 full stop landing at a controlled airport other than point of departure.
The National Pilot's license is issued as an "orange" book. RAASA has published the minimum requirements for training for each of these types as well as what credits are given to cross between them AS WELL AS what credits are given towards a part 61 license (PPL, etc...) See here: http://www.raasa.co.za/DOCUMENTS/Catego ... rsions.pdf

So getting back to the magazine subsription advert, there is a massive gap just below PPL which simply isn't filled with the term "microlight" ;)

Now another thing many seem to be in the dark over.... "A higher license covers a lower license" as we all know - By way of example, if an individual has a PPL (fixed wing) licence for example, then they can legally do a "same class" type conversion onto any type that fits into the NPL - LSA or NPL - CCM. The type conversion may be undertaken by either a part 61 or a part 62 instructor (part 61 instructors as grade 1, 2 and 3 - part 62 instructors as grade A, B and C).

Let's say that a PPL (fixed wing pilot) would like to do a type conversion on sat a Jabiru J170 (Designator JAB2), then the type conversion training can be performed by with a part 61 Grade 1 or 2 instructor or a part 62 Grade A or B instructor and the CAA papers signed off by same.

Most instructors will already know this, but a part 62 instructor (grade A or B) can also do an instructors type conversion (of applicable LSA & CCM types) for any part 61 instructor.

What are the requirements for a part 62 instructor?
See here: http://www.raasa.co.za/DOCUMENTS/Instru ... ements.pdf

So why do some folks only go for a National Pilot's License vs a PPL for example (or why do they swap their PPL our for a NPL licence?) - I'll let someone else explain further..... :D
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Re: What is a "National Pilot's License"?

Unread post by GERMAN »

Medical!
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Re: What is a "National Pilot's License"?

Unread post by Duck Rogers »

GERMAN wrote:Medical!
Bingo!
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Re: What is a "National Pilot's License"?

Unread post by GL »

For many recreational pilots the PPL theory has got too tough.
Credo quia absurdum
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Re: What is a "National Pilot's License"?

Unread post by Brend@n »

I had a long chat to an instructor I met at the Waterkloof air show about this subject. Its all about being realistic can I fork out 800k for a 182 and will the boss allow me to simple answer is no :cry: I will never be able to afford a 4 seater blik although I have thought of selling the wife for C210 8-[ .
Another thing is the cost of the license PPL is going in the area of 70 to 80k and national license half that and maintenance of a LSA or Microlight is also relatively cheap compared to a 182 :D
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Re: What is a "National Pilot's License"?

Unread post by jimdavis »

GL wrote:For many recreational pilots the PPL theory has got too tough.
And too stupid and irrelevant.

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Re: What is a "National Pilot's License"?

Unread post by jimdavis »

Steve, thanks for that - nice and clear. And it sorted out a lot of confusion in my mind. =D> =D> =D>

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Re: What is a "National Pilot's License"?

Unread post by stojan »

Thanks Steve, nice, clear explanation. Just a quick qestion though, where does the GPL (Glider Pilots License) fit in? Its also an Orange book issued by RAASA (in conjunction with SSSA), so does that mean its Part 62?
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Re: What is a "National Pilot's License"?

Unread post by PierreR »

Glider Licences used to be issued under ANR3.17 and are still provisionally being issued under this ANR as Part 104 that was intented for Glider operations was never published.
As the ANR's no longer exist, these are now going to fall under the new Part 68, the licences will still be issued by RAASA under this part.
All Glider operations will be conducted under SSSA as the ARO for gliding and training under the SSSA ATO.

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Re: What is a "National Pilot's License"?

Unread post by jimdavis »

And motor-gliders?

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Re: What is a "National Pilot's License"?

Unread post by LDV »

jimdavis wrote:
GL wrote:For many recreational pilots the PPL theory has got too tough.
A nd too stupid and irrelevant.

Jim
=D> =D> =D>
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Re: What is a "National Pilot's License"?

Unread post by Steve »

Duck Rogers wrote:
GERMAN wrote:Medical!
Bingo!
Of course, both you gents are 100% correct, an NPL only requires a minimum of a Class 4 medical which opens the "flying door" to many who might not pass a higher medical.

But there are so many other advantages of doing an NPL that most folks aren't aware of....I'll try and discuss a few of them below:-

COST TO CAREER - Many student pilots are incorrectly advised that if they wish to become "career pilots", they need to start off doing a PPL and progress from there. This is simply not true - starting off doing an NPL (LSA) license is far more cost effective and gives the student 30 hours credit towards their PPL - which effectively means they only need to do another 15 hours of flight training at PPL costs. Now I can hear some muttering "Yes, but they then have to do NPL theory exams followed by PPL theory exams!" - Not neccessarily - remember the statement earlier "That a higher license covers a lower license"? - Well, if the individual is intending flying as a career, they are allowed to do the PPL theory and write the PPL exams which will be seen as "full credits" for the NPL exams...So once they have completed the NPL (LSA) license, only the additional 15 hours of PPL flight training is required and of course a PPL flight test. The cool part is that they would have already done an NPL flight test which is very similar to the PPL flight test, so stands as good preperation.

What does a fresh NPL (LSA) pilot need to get a PPL?
Capture.JPG
EXPOPSURE TO EXPERIENCE - Now this point might be seen as contraversial, but please see it in context and not as an intention of knocking PPL flight schools, etc...
Generally speaking, the NPL license is designed and pitched at the recreational pilot - (Pilots who fly for fun or self transport, including business transport). The Instructor's usually found associated with the NPL schools (And here I am generalising, but is true for my region) are pilots who are businesspersons who fly for passion and not neccessarily career. Many of these individuals have several thousand hours of flying experience and many also hold PPL and COM licenses (Actually I know of one who also holds an ATP). These type of instructors don't see the student pilot as a "sausage in the sausage machine" and generally desire to impart knowledge and experience to the student, drawing on a vastly more significant depth of flying experience than many "250 hour newby Grade III instructors"
Students flying LSA types generally fly from "off-airport" airstrips and learn "bush conditions" and due to the low enertia factor of LSA's, a significant understanding in wind, wins shear and other factors they become exposed to.

By way of example, we have one NPL (LSA) instructor at one of the local schools who is a businessman (owns his own successful company) and offers part time instruction (out of passion) - He started out flying trikes (samoosas - as another avcomer coined the term) and went on to PPL, COM, multi-engine, turbines, etc.... and today also flies part time charter on twins and king airs. This individual has a huge range of experience in flying all sorts of aircraft and LSA's in varying conditions and weather, etc.... The students that have done training under him, rave about just how much they have learned and how exciting the lessons are - passion plays a huge role :)

...food for thought.....

BTW, thanks Jim for the kind words :D
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Re: What is a "National Pilot's License"?

Unread post by Thermalator »

PierreR wrote:Glider Licences used to be issued under ANR3.17 and are still provisionally being issued under this ANR as Part 104 that was intented for Glider operations was never published.
As the ANR's no longer exist, these are now going to fall under the new Part 68, the licences will still be issued by RAASA under this part..
Thanks Pierre, From your POV what's the difference to part 62. It seems to revolve around that little word 'National'.
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Re: What is a "National Pilot's License"?

Unread post by HansH »

Don't be fooled by the Medical story. Having done Class 1 medicals for 45 years and now since I hold a NPL requiring a Class 4 medical I have found these medicals to be far more picky than any I have ever experienced.
The first Class 4 medical was signed off for 3 years and because that Doctor buggered of to Ozland the nexy Medical Examiner I saw would only renew for 1 year because of a Beta Blocker protocol that I have been on for 30 years, notwithstanding that the Cardiologist only wants to see me every 2 years. Then IAM climbed on the bandwagon and demanded a Cardiologist report, 24 hr Holter monitor and blood pressure ambulatory test. The Cardiologist subsequently voiced his opinion on their demands and that seems to have quietened things down....for the time being. Then there was more drama during the medical and when I pointed out that this was a Class 4 affair the attitude was that a medical is a medical irrespective of class.From experience I can assure you that there is absolutely no difference as far as I can see.
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Re: What is a "National Pilot's License"?

Unread post by Thermalator »

You do not want IAM involved, if you want to keep your blood pressure down.. that is (punny)

Good news is - you don't have to, class 4 can be done by your family GP - another advantage of part 62/68
Last edited by Thermalator on Tue Oct 11, 2011 11:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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